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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Meade's Division, First Army Corps

 
 
Meade's Division, First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Meade's Division, First Army Corps Marker
Inscription.
U.S.A.
Meade's Division, First Army Corps,

Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, Commanding.
September 17, 1862.

Meade's Division formed at about 6:30 a.m. in the following order: Seymour's Brigade on the left and in advance, Magilton's and Anderson's Brigades in columns of masses in suport. As Anderson and Magilton emerged from the North Woods, they were deployed to fill the gap between Doubleday's and Ricketts' Divisions. Magilton's Brigade was soon withdrawn and moved to the left in support of Seymour and Ricketts.

Through the gap thus made the enemy attempted to advance, but were checked by the fire of the Corps Artillery and by the arrival of the Twelfth Army Corps.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 11.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 29.328′ N, 77° 44.755′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Mansfield Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Located just east of the pull off for stop two on the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield, the Poffenberger Farm. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Meade's Division, First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Meade's Division, First Army Corps Marker
At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Meade's Division, First Army Corps (here, next to this marker); First Army Corps (here, next to this marker); 3rd Regt. Pennsylvania (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named First Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); 1st Corps, 3rd Division, 2nd Brigade Bivouac (a few steps from this marker); 8th Regt. Pennsylvania Reserver Volunteer Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); 4th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); The Culmination of Another Great Tragedy was at Hand (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Clara Barton (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Clara Barton (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Meade's Division Markers
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 3rd Division, I Corps. When Meade replaced the wounded Hooker as Corps commander, Brig. Gen. Truman Seymour of 1st Brigade took command of the Division. Locations of the brigades
Cluster of Tablets around the 3rd Pennsylvania Reserves Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Cluster of Tablets around the 3rd Pennsylvania Reserves Monument
War Department Tablets (from left to right) 16, 15, 11 and 1 flank the 3rd Pennsylvania Reserves Monument along side the northern leg of Mansfield Avenue. The unit bivouac tablet D stands closest to the camera on the left.
of the 3rd Division are detailed in three maps linked on this Antietam on the Web page. (Submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. The Pennsylvania Reserves. Site dedicated to the Pennsylvania Reserves. Many good resources. (Submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. George Meade. George Gordon Meade (December 31, 1815 – November 6, 1872) was a career United States Army officer and civil engineer involved in the coastal construction of several lighthouses. (Submitted on October 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Meade's Division, First Army Corps Marker<br>Second From the Right image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Meade's Division, First Army Corps Marker
Second From the Right
Major General George Meade (1815-1872) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Major General George Meade (1815-1872)
In the Battle of Antietam, Meade replaced the wounded Hooker in command of I Corps, selected personally by McClellan over other generals his superior in rank. He performed well at Antietam, but was wounded in the thigh.
Meade's division Advance - Left Flank image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. Meade's division Advance - Left Flank
With Seymour's Brigade in the East Woods, Meade had two brigades on line to advance to fill the gap between Doubleday's and Ricketts' Divisions. Magilton's advanced south here, with an axis of advance aimed at the Dunker Church. On the right of this photo are the buildings of the D.R. Miller farm. In the far distance of this photo, the spire of the New York State Monument stands out next to the Visitors Center. Just below the monument can be seen one of the monuments on Cornfield Avenue. Magilton's Brigade reached a position about half way between the North Woods (foreground here) and that monument on Cornfield Avenue before moving into the East Woods, leaving a gap in the Federal lines.
Meade's division Advance - Right Flank image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
7. Meade's division Advance - Right Flank
On the other side of Meade's line, (seen from a point on Mansfield Avenue looking south) Anderson's Brigade passed out of the North Woods and over the high ground here. The advance took the brigade through open fields north of the Cornfield and up to the northern edge of that sector of the battlefield. The Brigade helped push the Texas Brigade out of the Cornfield.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 663 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on October 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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