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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Union in Monroe County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Salt Sulphur

 
 
Salt Sulphur Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2012
1. Salt Sulphur Marker
Inscription. Opened as a resort in 1820. Main building erected about 1823. Martin Van Buren, Clay, and Calhoun among prominent guests. General Jenkins and other Confederate leaders made headquarters here during several campaign.
 
Location. 37° 34.26′ N, 80° 34.26′ W. Marker is near Union, West Virginia, in Monroe County. Marker is at the intersection of Koontz Road (U.S. 219) and County Route 10/5, on the left when traveling south on Koontz Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Union WV 24983, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Big Lime (approx. 1.2 miles away); Chapman House (approx. 2 miles away); William Porcher Miles (approx. 2.1 miles away); General John Echols (approx. 2.1 miles away); Union College (approx. 2.1 miles away); Union (approx. 2.1 miles away); Crook's Occupation of Union (approx. 2.1 miles away); Bishop Matthew W. Clair, Sr. (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Union.
 
Also see . . .  National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. “By the 1830’s the resort was equipped to handle, and frequently served, upwards of a thousand or more guests (1439 in 1838). Despite business setbacks caused by the Civil War, Salt Sulphur regained some of its former popularity
Salt Sulphur Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 30, 2015
2. Salt Sulphur Marker
after 1882. The book on West Virginia published by the West Virginia Commission of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904 gives the following account of Salt Sulphur:

“ ‘The Salt Sulphur Springs on Indian creek, near the town of Union in Monroe County, have been for many years a favorite resort. They are surrounded by beautiful mountain scenery and are reached by driving over a splendid road fourteen miles from Fort Spring Station on the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway. In addition to the Salt Sulphur Springs, there is an Iodine Spring, a Sweet Sulphur Spring, and a Chalybeate Spring; thus affording an opportunity for a variety of treatment, but it is not so much a resort for invalids as for those who desire rest and recreation.

“ ‘The “Old Salt” is like a hospitable manor of the old regime; with its beautiful park through which, under magnificent forest trees, a clear stream flows. On the wide porches of its spacious, comfortable, and substantial buildings, the days are always cool.

“ ‘The hotel and cottages are built of stone, and contain roomy and comfortable apartments, nicely furnished and easy of access. The wide and lofty ball room, with its splendid floor, is a superb place for dancing. A neat little stage, with several sets of scenery and a large assortment of costumes, is always ready
Old Salt Sulphur Spring Resort, now a private residence image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2012
3. Old Salt Sulphur Spring Resort, now a private residence
for amateur theatricals... Adjoining it, are eleven acres of most beautiful lawn. The elevation is two thousand feet above sea level.’ ” (Submitted on June 3, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Notable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
The Former Salt Sulphur Spring Resort image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2012
4. The Former Salt Sulphur Spring Resort
The Former Salt Sulphur Spring Resort image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2012
5. The Former Salt Sulphur Spring Resort
Stone Store Building (1820) hides the adjacent Stone Church (c. 1836) image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 30, 2015
6. Stone Store Building (1820) hides the adjacent Stone Church (c. 1836)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 7, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 272 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 7, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   2. submitted on June 3, 2015, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on September 7, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   6. submitted on June 3, 2015, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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