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Alderson in Monroe County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Alderson's Ferry

Strategic Crossing

 
 
Alderson's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2012
1. Alderson's Ferry Marker
Inscription. Here, where you are standing, you can see both sides of the Greenbrier River where Alderson’s Ferry crossed. The ferry was named for Elder John Alderson who received the original charter from the Virginia Legislature in 1786. During the Civil War, the ferry played a significant role as both Union and Confederate forces used it to carry men and supplies across the river here. On June 22, 1862 for example, 1,600 Federal troops were ferried over the river here on an expedition into Monroe County.

Because of the importance of the ferry, occasionally engagements were fought here as each side sought to control the crossing or deny the ferry’s use to the enemy. On July 12, 1862, Union Capt. William B. Harrison, leading two cavalry companies from Col. George Crook’s brigade, engaged Confederate cavalrymen here. His command killed or wounded seven of them and captured about a dozen of their horses.

Gen. Rutherford B. Hayes, the future president of the United States, crossed his brigade over the river into Greenbrier County just upstream from here on May 18, 1864. It took twenty-four hours for the entire brigade to cross.

Hayes’s brigade was part of Gen. George Crook’s Army of the Kanawha, which camped here in May 1864. Dr. Thomas G. Clay, who operated the ferry, was taken into custody and detained for a day without
Alderson's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2012
2. Alderson's Ferry Marker
Crook’s knowledge. When Crook learned of it, he ordered Clays immediate release and directed that his property not be molested. Clay lived in the ferryman’s house that stood on your right across the modern railroad tracks, just beyond the apartment building and the flat, grassy lot.
 
Erected by West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the West Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 37° 43.458′ N, 80° 38.586′ W. Marker is in Alderson, West Virginia, in Monroe County. Marker is at the intersection of South Monroe Street (West Virginia Route 3) and Railroad Avenue on South Monroe Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Alderson WV 24910, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Greenbrier County / Monroe County (a few steps from this marker); Alderson (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Alderson Baptist Academy and Junior College (approx. 0.3 miles away); Reformatory for Women (approx. 0.4 miles away); Greenbrier County / Summers County (approx. 1.3 miles away); Fort Greenbrier
Alderson's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2012
3. Alderson's Ferry Marker
(approx. 6.9 miles away); Unknown Soldiers/ Gen. Lewis' Trace (approx. 7.7 miles away); Big Bend Tunnel (approx. 8.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alderson.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Alderson's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2012
4. Alderson's Ferry Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 10, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 395 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 10, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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