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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Davis in Jeff Davis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Wild Rose Pass

 
 
Wild Rose Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 10, 2012
1. Wild Rose Pass Marker
Inscription. In early days the Indian trail through these mountains followed the gorge below known as Limpia Canyon. To avoid the floods travelers over the San Antonio - El Paso Road, emigrants, U.S. troops and supply trains, and the mail chose this higher pass famed for its wealth of wild roses.
 
Erected 1956 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 10490.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antonio de Espejo Entrada of 1582-1583, and the San Antonio-El Paso Road marker series.
 
Location. 30° 42.893′ N, 103° 46.939′ W. Marker is in Fort Davis, Texas, in Jeff Davis County. Marker is on Wild Rose Pass (State Highway 17) 1.3 miles south of Powell Ranch Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Davis TX 79734, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Barry Scobee Mountain (approx. 9.3 miles away); St. Joseph Catholic Church (approx. 10.4 miles away); Fort Davis (approx. 10.4 miles away); The First Fort Davis (approx. 10 miles away); San Antonio-El Paso Road (approx. 10.6 miles away); Hotel Limpia
Wild Rose Pass Marker in context image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 10, 2012
2. Wild Rose Pass Marker in context
(approx. 11 miles away); Union Mercantile (approx. 11 miles away); T/SGT. Manuel S. Gonzales (approx. 11 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Davis.
 
Regarding Wild Rose Pass. In reference to the Indian trail mentioned on the marker, in 1583 Spanish explorer Antonio de Espejo, on his return journey south from New Mexico, planned to follow the Pecos River from near present Pecos, Texas to the pueblos at La Junta de los Rios (where the Concho River of Mexico joins the Rio Grande at present day Presidio, TX and Ojinaga, Mexico). He was dissuaded from this route by Jumano Indians he encountered on Toyah Creek (near Pecos, TX), and shown a more direct route - part of their own north-south trade route - through what are now the Davis Mountains: leaving the Pecos River travelling up Toyah Creek valley, past San Solomon Spring at present day Toyahvale, TX, through Wild Rose Pass, along Limpia Creek to what is now Fort Davis, TX, then south to La Junta de los Rios. The Jumanos: Hunters and Traders of the South Plains by Nancy Parrott Hickerson
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Markers relating to the San Antonio - El Paso Road
Marker in context image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 10, 2012
3. Marker in context
View from the marker, looking south through the pass, on the way to Fort Davis
& Ft. Davis
 
Also see . . .  Wild Rose Pass. Handbook of Texas Online (Submitted on September 23, 2012, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Hispanic AmericansNative AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Wild Rose Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 24, 2012
4. Wild Rose Pass Marker
View from marker looking north on State Route 17.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 23, 2012, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 565 times since then and 77 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 23, 2012, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   4. submitted on November 19, 2012, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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