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Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

John Kirby Allen (1810-1838)

Co-founder of Houston

 
 
John Kirby Allen (1810-19338) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 16, 2012
1. John Kirby Allen (1810-19338) Marker
Inscription.
Gravesite of
John Kirby Allen (1810-1838)
Co-founder of Houston

Houston in 1836 was a humid swamp overgrown with sweet gum trees and coffee bean weeds. In this spot, however, two brothers from New York recognized the future "commercial emporium of Texas."

John Kirby Allen was born and lived in New York until moving to Texas in 1832 with his older brother Augustus Chapman Allen, a professor of mathematics.

A natural leader with a magnetic personality, J.K. Allen was an astute businessman as well. He and his brother soon saw that the area around Buffalo Bayou could readily become a major seaport. Immediately after the Battle of San Jacinto (April 21, 1836), J.K. Allen carefully chose the site of future Houston.

On August 24 and 26, the brothers paid $9,428 for 6,642 acres of land originally granted by Mexico to John Austin, a pioneer colonist. Fittingly, they named the town for Sam Houston, leader of the Texas Army.

In glowing words, the brothers advertised their infant town all over the United States; and J.K. Allen, who was soon elected representative to the Texas Congress, worked unceasingly to make Houston the capital of Texas, as it became — 1837 to 1839.

At 28, J.K. Allen died of congestive fever, but the town he founded has since
Founders' Memorial Park Cemetery Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 16, 2012
2. Founders' Memorial Park Cemetery Entrance
become Texas' largest city.
 
Erected 1968 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 10593.)
 
Location. 29° 45.458′ N, 95° 22.734′ W. Marker is in Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Valentine Street and West Dallas Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Houston TX 77019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Augustus Chapman Allen ( here, next to this marker); Amos B. Edson ( a few steps from this marker); Origins of Freedman's Town ( approx. 0.2 miles away); Sam Houston Park Monument ( approx. 0.4 miles away); Sons of the Republic of Texas ( approx. 0.4 miles away); Ancient Order of Pilgrims ( approx. half a mile away); Pillot House (was approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing. ); San Felipe Cottage (was approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Houston.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. John Kirby Allen.
Founders Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 16, 2012
3. Founders Cemetery
Wikipedia (Submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.) 

2. John Kirby Allen. The Handbook of Texas Online, Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.) 

3. John Kirby Allen. Texas Heritage Society (Submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.) 

4. John Kirby Allen. The Texas Underground (Submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.) 

5. An article on John Kirby Allen in Enotes. (Submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesSettlements & Settlers
 
Founders Memorial Park Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 16, 2012
4. Founders Memorial Park Cemetery
John Kirby Allen Ad for Houston, Texas image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 16, 2012
5. John Kirby Allen Ad for Houston, Texas
John Allen and his brother ran advertisements all over the U.S. trying to get people to move to Houston. This is the end of one of them. They extolled the virtues of Houston living, though it was a steamy, bug infested, swamp land. It seems to have worked; Houston became the largest city in Texas and the fourth largest in the U.S. This is not near the cemetery. It's from a wall at Allen's Landing park, located near the original dock on Buffalo Bayou where the Allen brothers started about 1 1/2 miles from this location.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 552 times since then and 69 times this year. Last updated on September 27, 2012. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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