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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mansfield

 
 
Mansfield Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Mansfield Monument
Inscription.
(Front Face):
Major General
Joseph K. F. Mansfield
Commanding the 12th Corps
Army of the Potomac
Mortally wounded near this spot
September 17th, 1862
About 7-35 a.m.
While deploying his corps
in action


(Left Face):
Erected by the
State of Connecticut
A.D. 1900
Under the auspices of
Mansfield Post No. 53
Dep't of Connecticut G.A.R.

(Right Face):
The spot where
General Mansfield fell is a few yards
easterly from this monument
Born Dec. 22nd 1803
Killed Sept. 17th 1862

 
Erected 1900 by State of Connecticut.
 
Location. 39° 28.997′ N, 77° 44.506′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of Smoketown Road and Mansfield
Front Face Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
2. Front Face Inscription
Monument Road, on the left when traveling south on Smoketown Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Twelfth Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Twelfth Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps. (within shouting distance of this marker); First Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); Major General Joseph K. F. Mansfield (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named First Army Corps (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Twelfth Army Corps (about 500 feet away); 12th Pennsylvania Cavalry
Left Face Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
3. Left Face Inscription
The bronze plaque in the center was recently replaced. See link below regarding restoration of the monument.
(about 500 feet away); William's Division, Twelfth Army Corps (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Twelfth Army Corps (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Regarding Mansfield. This marker is included on the East Woods Virtual Tour by Markers see the Virtual tour link below to see the markers in sequence.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mansfield Monument. National Park Service page detailing the monument. (Submitted on March 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Major General Joseph Mansfield. Mansfield had served in the army for 40 years at the time of his death. (Submitted on March 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Mansfield Monument Restoration. In 2002, the bronze plaque on the right side
Right Face Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
4. Right Face Inscription
was stolen. The article details the efforts to restore the monument. (Submitted on March 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. East Woods Virtual Tour by Markers. A collection of markers interpreting the action of during the Battle of Antietam around the East Woods. (Submitted on March 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Joseph K.F. Mansfield Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
5. Joseph K.F. Mansfield Monument
Major General Joseph K.F. Mansfield (1803-1862) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
6. Major General Joseph K.F. Mansfield (1803-1862)
His horse was hit and a bullet caught him squarely in the right chest. Writes Dr. Patrick Henry Flood, Surgeon, 107th NY Regiment, in a letter to his widow, "I found the clothing around his chest saturated with blood, and upon opening them, found he was wounded in the right breast, the ball penetrating about two inches from the nipple, and passing out the back, near the edge of the shoulder blade."
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 785 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on October 26, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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