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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alexandria, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First Original Federal Boundary Stone

District of Columbia

 
 
First Original Federal Boundary Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 21, 2008
1. First Original Federal Boundary Stone Marker
Inscription. Placed April 15, 1791. Protected by Mount Vernon Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, April 30, 1926.
 
Erected 1926 by Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Original Federal Boundary Stones marker series.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 38° 47.42′ N, 77° 2.435′ W. Marker was in Alexandria, Virginia. Marker could be reached from South Street near South Washington Street (Virginia Route 400). Touch for map. It is in Jones Point Park, at the lighthouse. Marker was in this post office area: Alexandria VA 22314, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. D.C.'s First Building Block (here, next to this marker); The Nations Capital Begins Here 1791-1793 (here, next to this marker); Who Owns the River? (within shouting distance of this marker); Mistress Margaret Brent (within shouting distance of this marker); The Remarkable Margaret Brent (within shouting distance of this marker); The Jones Point Lighthouse
First Original Federal Boundary Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 21, 2008
2. First Original Federal Boundary Stone Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Mountains of Materials and Massive Manpower (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); World Wars to the Present (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alexandria.
 
More about this marker. Marker is on the Jones Point Lighthouse brick and concrete seawall, set into a concrete slab with a hole in it, for seeing the boundary stone.
 
Regarding First Original Federal Boundary Stone. The Washington, D.C. South Boundary Stone is in a niche in the seawall at the Jones Point Light. The niche has a locked iron bar door. The best view is standing on the riprap in front of the seawall, but be especially careful if the riprap is wet, as it becomes quite slippery.

This monument was laid by George Washington himself, in full Masonic regalia.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Three of the four corner boundary stones: North, East, and South. Can you find and add the fourth to the database?
 
Also see . . .  Boundary Stones of Washington, D.C. — South. “As documented
Boundary Stone Niche in Seawall image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 21, 2008
3. Boundary Stone Niche in Seawall
by Woodward and others, the stone was hidden behind this seawall until June 1912. Because the stone remains in an enclosure in the wall, it still is not possible to view it in its entirety.” (Submitted on June 21, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Political Subdivisions
 
District of Columbia South Boundary Stone image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 21, 2008
4. District of Columbia South Boundary Stone
First Original Federal Boundary Stone Imprisoned in the Seawall image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 21, 2008
5. First Original Federal Boundary Stone Imprisoned in the Seawall
Jones Point Light image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 21, 2008
6. Jones Point Light
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 21, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,708 times since then and 53 times this year. Last updated on October 8, 2012, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 21, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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