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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anderson in Anderson County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Site of First African American High School in Anderson County

Reed Street High School

 
 
Site of First African American High School in Anderson County Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 25, 2012
1. Site of First African American High School in Anderson County Monument
Inscription.
After another high school was built, Reed Street High was renamed Perry Elementary School.
Perry Elementary later became known as
Perry Child Development Center.

This memorial is dedicated to the students teachers and principals who were a part of these historic institutions.

Presented to the Citizens of the City of
Anderson and Anderson County by the
Reed High School Alumni, July 9, 2004

 
Erected 2004 by Reed High School Alumni.
 
Location. 34° 29.933′ N, 82° 39.15′ W. Marker is in Anderson, South Carolina, in Anderson County. Marker is at the intersection of West Reed Street and South Towers Street on West Reed Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Anderson SC 29624, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. Paul's Baptist Church -- 1865 (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Thompson Centennial United ME Church -- 1867 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Historic Wilhite House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Grace Episcopal Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sullivan Hardware Co. -- 1875
Site of First African American High School in Anderson County Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 25, 2012
2. Site of First African American High School in Anderson County Monument
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Bank of Anderson Building - ca. 1891 (approx. 0.3 miles away); First Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); In Commemoration of Black Pioneers (approx. 0.3 miles away); St. John's Methodist Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Anderson County Law Enforcement Officers Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anderson.
 
Categories. African AmericansEducation
 
Parker School image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 25, 2012
3. Parker School
Parker School image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 25, 2012
4. Parker School
Parker School image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 25, 2012
5. Parker School
Reed Street School image. Click for full size.
Anderson County by Howard Woody, circa 1918
6. Reed Street School
In the late 1890s the Greeley Institute on McDuffie Street taught African-American students. Two black schools were being used in 1900 and Greeley had 5 teachers and 583 students. A brick school was constructed in 1901 at a cost of $3,000 on the corner of South Towers and Reed Streets. The 1905 city directory called it Grammar School #1 and Mr. M.H. Gassaway was principal with 9 teachers.
Faculty, Reed Street School image. Click for full size.
Anderson County by Howard Woody, circa 1914
7. Faculty, Reed Street School
The faculty of the Reed Street African-American High School included Prof. M.H. Gassaway as principal and teachers Mrs. Gassaway, Mr. Todd, Mrs. Todd, A. Anderson, I. Watson, Mr. Rhodes, M. Gassaway, Mrs. Moore, and M.G. Brown. Black teachers' average salaries for 1900 were $108 while salaries in 1901 were $113. In 1918 the Reed Street School had an enrollment of 286 students and 11 teachers in the 7 elementary grades and a 3-year high school program.
Rosenwald's Reed Street School image. Click for full size.
Anderson County by Howard Woody, 1922
8. Rosenwald's Reed Street School
The Julius Rosenwald Fund was established to promote the building of Southern black schoolhouses. The school board asked the fund to help replace the old Reed Street School. They accepted and Rosenwald contributed $1,600, while gifts totaled $11,400, and the state contributed $42,000 to erect this 12-teacher black schoolhouse. From 1914 to 1932 the Rosenwald Fund assisted in the building of 4,977 mainly rural brick schools in the South. The fund assisted 481 South Carolina schools with gifts totaling $463,000 or 15.68 percent of each school's costs.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 25, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 801 times since then and 63 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on October 25, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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