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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The 19th Indiana Infantry

 
 
The 19th Indiana Infantry Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. The 19th Indiana Infantry Monument
Inscription.
4th Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps
Lieut. Colonel Alois O. Bachman Commanding
Until he fell mortally wounded
150 yards due east, occupied this ground
at 2 p.m. September 17th 1862.
Loss 13 killed; 58 wounded

 
Erected 1910 by State of Indiana.
 
Location. 39° 28.775′ N, 77° 44.874′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Dunker Church Road / Old Hagerstown Pike, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Twelfth Army Corps (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sedgwick's Division, Second Army Corps (about 300 feet away); Aftermath Along the Hagerstown Turnpike (about 300 feet away); Jackson's Command (about 300 feet away); Massachusetts State Monument (about 400 feet away); Second Regiment (about 500 feet away); New Jersey State Monument (about 500 feet away); 124th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (about 500 feet away); Brigadier General William E. Starke (about 500 feet away); First Army Corps (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
The 19th Indiana Infantry Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. The 19th Indiana Infantry Monument

1. 19th Indiana Infantry Monument. National Park Service page detailing the monument. (Submitted on March 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 19th Indiana Infantry. The regiment went through a secession of commanders during the campaign. Col. Solomon Meredith was sidelined days before the battle due to fatigue and old injuries. Lt. Col. Alois Bachman was mortally wounded during the battle. Command fell to Captain William Dudley, who led the regiment through the remainder of the battle. The Regiment was part of the famed "Black Hats Brigade" also known as the "Iron Brigade." (Submitted on March 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. LTC Alois O. Bachman, Jr. - Find-a-grave. (Submitted on October 17, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
19th Indiana Monument beside the Modern Farm Buildings on Dunker Church Road image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
3. 19th Indiana Monument beside the Modern Farm Buildings on Dunker Church Road
The 19th Indiana Infantry Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. The 19th Indiana Infantry Monument
Lieut. Colonel Alois O. Bachman (1839-1862) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Lieut. Colonel Alois O. Bachman (1839-1862)
He served as Lieutenant Colonel of the 19th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which was part of the famous "Iron Brigade." He was killed at the Battle of Antietam in the brutal struggle for the Cornfield.
High Water Mark for the 1st Division 1 Corps image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. High Water Mark for the 1st Division 1 Corps
In the early stages of the morning portion of the battle, Gibbon's Brigade, of which the 19th Indiana was a part, moved south down the Hagerstown Pike. The Brigade passed through the western part of the cornfield and penetrated nearly to the Dunker Church. From this view, looking north on the Dunker Church Road (the old Hagerstown Pike), the point Gibbon's Brigade reached was roughly on line with the second utility pole on the right. At that point, the Brigade still faced south (toward the camera). In the distance down the pike, beyond the modern farm buildings, are the New Jersey and Indiana state monuments, marking the southwest corner of the Cornfield. The 19th Indiana Monument is along the road, adjacent to the farm buildings. On the left side of the road are the West Woods, from which Starke's and Warren's Confederate Brigades retreated away from the advancing Federals.
Looking South from the 19th Indiana Monument Location image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
7. Looking South from the 19th Indiana Monument Location
This view across the fields immediately east of the Old Hagerstown Pike demonstrates the problems imposed by terrain on the combatants. Not more than fifty yards in front of the Brigade's advance was a blind spot due to the folds of the ridge line. The limit of the advance was just past the right most utility pole. In the distance on the right are the Maryland and New York State monuments further south. Between the Maryland Monument and the blind spot, Wofford's Confederate Brigade began their famous charge into the the Cornfield, that drove Gibbon's Brigade back to the Miller Farm.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 806 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 17, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on March 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on October 17, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on March 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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