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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Montgomery County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Margaret Houck

 
 
Margaret Houck Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 25, 2008
1. Margaret Houck Marker
Inscription.
While A Slave She Nursed
Wounded at the Battle Of
Monmouth June 28, 1778, Moved
To the Area with Her Owner,
Became a Beloved Care Giver

 
Erected 1998 by George E. Pataki.
 
Location. 42° 48.19′ N, 74° 24.19′ W. Marker is in Charleston, New York, in Montgomery County. Marker is on E Lykers Rd (County Route 103), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sprakers NY 12166, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Christian Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Burial Place (approx. 3.9 miles away); Carlisle Grove Seminary (approx. 3.9 miles away); Samuel Tallmadge Grave Site (approx. 4 miles away); William McConkey Grave Site (approx. 4 miles away); Baptist Church (approx. 4.3 miles away); Indian Stone Heap (approx. 4.7 miles away); Sloansville (approx. 4.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
More about this marker. 1998 marked the 150th Anniversary of the Womenís Rights Movement, launched at the world's first Womenís Rights Convention held in Seneca Falls, New York on July 19 to July 20, 1848.

To
Margaret Houck Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 25, 2008
2. Margaret Houck Marker
honor that anniversary The New York State Governorís Commission Honoring the Achievements of Women has expanded the New York State historical marker program, started in 1926, to more accurately reflect womenís contributions to history. Each county was asked to participate by nominating three historic local women who contributed to the community and deserved recognition. From these nominations, the Commission sponsored the creation and installation of a historical marker for every participating county.

The markers are cast iron painted with the colors of the suffrage movement, purple and gold. The markers were dedicated and installed throughout the state during the fall of 1998, during the New York State Governor George Pataki administration. The Margaret Houck marker is one of approximately 50 markers added that year.
 
Regarding Margaret Houck. Margaret Houck (c. 1766-September 20, 1872) lies buried in the Christian Church Cemetery at Charleston Four Corners. Her gravestone notes that she was about 106 years old, and her epitaph reads: “She was a slave at the Battle of Monmouth, N.J., June 28, 1778. Made free in Christ in 1813. Now free indeed."

Houck was found to be buried in the well-to-do area of the grave yard, showing the esteem with which she was held in a time when such a placement was unheard of. At the
Margaret Houck Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 25, 2008
3. Margaret Houck Marker
time of her passing on Sept. 20, 1872, it is believed that the townspeople got together and purchased a marble marker which was placed on her grave site.
 
Also see . . .
1. Charleston Four Corners Christian Church Cemetery: Partial Reading. (Submitted on November 18, 2012, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
2. Charleston, Christian Church Cemetery, Margaret Houck Grave. (Submitted on September 15, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesSettlements & SettlersWar, US RevolutionaryWomen
 
Margaret Houck Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 14, 2013
4. Margaret Houck Grave Marker
MARGARET
wife of
Joseph Houck
died September 20, 1872
about 106
“She was a slave at the Battle of Monmouth, N.J., June 28, 1778. Made free in Christ in 1813. Now free indeed."
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 16, 2012, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 357 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 16, 2012, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   4. submitted on September 15, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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