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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Great Baltimore Fire

 
 
The Great Baltimore Fire Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 12, 2008
1. The Great Baltimore Fire Marker
Inscription. On Sunday morning, February 7, 1904, a spark ignited blankets and cotton goods in the firm of John E. Hurst and Company, which stood between Hopkins Place and Liberty on the south side of German (now Redwood) Street. Flames leapt out of control from building to building due to high winds. A total of 1,231 fireman and 400 volunteers sprayed 20 million gallons of water on the flames. By the time the fire was under control on Monday evening, it had consumed 1,500 buildings over approximately 140 acres. Many people sustained substantial material loss. Damage was estimated to be more than 125 million dollars. Miraculously, however, there were no serious injuries and only one reported fatality.

The leaders of Baltimore decided to use this disaster as an opportunity to improve their city and make it more appealing. As a result of careful and thoughtful planning, civic leaders created a thriving, modern port city with wider streets, more efficient docks, an improved sewer system, and sturdy masonry and steel buildings.
 
Location. 39° 16.997′ N, 76° 36.707′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is on Light Street (Maryland Route 2). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Baltimore MD 21202, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Marker with the Baltimore harbor in the background image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 12, 2008
2. Marker with the Baltimore harbor in the background
The National Aquarium can be seen in the background.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Baltimoreís Maritime Heritage (a few steps from this marker); Pride of Baltimore (within shouting distance of this marker); Admiral Guillermo Brown (within shouting distance of this marker); Baltimore Turns the Tide (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); A History of Firsts in Baltimore (about 400 feet away); Adventure Begins at the Bay's Front Door (about 400 feet away); Baltimoreís Part in Saving the Bay (about 500 feet away); United States Merchant Seamen Memorial (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Also see . . .
1. Maryland Digital Cultural Heritage Project/The Great Baltimore Fire. Interactive Map with Photographs and Time Line of The Great Baltimore Fire of 1904 (Submitted on May 21, 2008, by Tabitha Preast of Hanover, Maryland.) 

2. Fire Museum of Maryland. "Audio walking tour available of Museumís Great Baltimore Fire Exhibit. Learn about the Fire and what happened through the eyes of Chief George Horton, the fire fighters who fought it and residents as they watched the city burn." (Submitted on May 21, 2008, by Tabitha Preast of Hanover, Maryland.) 

3. The Baltimore Sun archives.
<i>Scene After the Great Fire, Baltimore, Md.</i> image. Click for full size.
circa 1907
3. Scene After the Great Fire, Baltimore, Md.
"The front page article about the Baltimore fire from The Sun extra edition of Monday, February 8, 1904. The link includes a photo gallery of the fire. (Submitted on May 21, 2008, by Tabitha Preast of Hanover, Maryland.) 

4. Baltimore Maryland Panoramic Photo Gallery. Several photos of the fire's aftermath can be viewed here. (Submitted on May 21, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. 20th Century
 
Cycloramic view of the burned area of Baltimore's Fire image. Click for full size.
Frederick W. Mueller, from the Library of Congress Collection, circa February 8, 1904
4. Cycloramic view of the burned area of Baltimore's Fire
Cycloramic view of Baltimore's Fire from Hanover St. image. Click for full size.
Frederick W. Mueller, from the Library of Congress Collection, circa February 8, 1904
5. Cycloramic view of Baltimore's Fire from Hanover St.
Baltimore Fire image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
6. Baltimore Fire
This eye-witness painting of the Baltimore Fire by Theobald Chartran hangs in the Maryland Historical Society Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. The signature block reads: T. Chartran, Baltimore, Sunday night Feb 7 1904.

“This impressionistic scene depicts a birds-eye view of the Baltimore fire of February 7, 1904. Chartran, a French artist, was best known for his portraits of famous Europeans and Americans, including Cardinal Gibbons, and his work for the magazine, Vanity Fair. He is said to have almost lost his life while painting the fire, working in dangerous proximity to the disaster in order to capture the terror of the destruction.” — Maryland Historical Society
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 12, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,700 times since then and 82 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week February 2, 2014. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 12, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   3. submitted on September 24, 2015.   4, 5. submitted on May 21, 2008, by Tabitha Preast of Hanover, Maryland.   6. submitted on September 21, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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