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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hope in Hempstead County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)
 

William Jefferson Clinton

First Home of the 42nd President of the United States

 
 
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
1. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
Inscription. Dedicated March 12, 1999. Mike Huckabee Governor, Jim Hill State Senator, Sandra Rodgers State Representative. Major Benefactors-Century Tube, Inc, Swepco, Entergy, Sanyo Manufacturing Corp, Future Tech Intel, Nina Wang, Ben & Martha Bryant, Nissan North America, Reliant Energy Arkla, International Paper Co., Dr Elias & Jody Ghanam Family, Selma & Walter Kaye, United Parcel Service.
 
Location. 33° 40.056′ N, 93° 35.802′ W. Marker is in Hope, Arkansas, in Hempstead County. Marker is on South Hervey Street. Touch for map. This marker is in the Court Yard in the rear of the Home. Marker is at or near this postal address: 117 South Hervey Street, Hope AR 71801, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Skirmishes at Prairie D'Ane (approx. 13.9 miles away).
 
Regarding William Jefferson Clinton. The William Jefferson Clinton First Home is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

The home became a National Historic Site in the National Park System on April 16, 2011.
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
2. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
3. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
4. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
5. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
6. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
7. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
8. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
9. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
10. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
William Jefferson Clinton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 9, 2010
11. William Jefferson Clinton Marker
William Jefferson Clinton image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
12. William Jefferson Clinton
This 2006 portrait of William Jefferson Clinton by Chuck Close hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“A key to Bill Clinton’s successes as president, along with his resilience and personal affability, was his determination to govern through consensus. Major accomplishments, such as welfare reform, the first budget surplus since the late 1960s, and successful U.S. intervention in the Balkans stemmed from this pragmatic viewpoint. Other proposals, such as universal health care, failed. His administration was plagued by several scandals, such as Whitewater and the consequences of his affair with a White House intern. His denial under oath about this relationship led to his impeachment. He was not convicted in the Senate trial, however, and his popularity actually increased as Americans continued to admire Clinton for his political talents, quick intelligence, and determination.

Chuck Close begins all his paintings by taking a photograph of the subject, in this case a 2005 image made as a cover for New York Magazine. He then creates grids on both the canvas and the original image to replicate the information contained in the photograph with a series of abstract modules.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 13, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 724 times since then and 88 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on December 13, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   12. submitted on August 12, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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