Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Providence Forge in Charles City County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Smith Captured by Virginia Indians

Chickahominy Water Trail

 
 
John Smith Captured by Virginia Indians Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, December 15, 2012
1. John Smith Captured by Virginia Indians Marker
Inscription. John Smith explored the upper Chickahominy River in December 1607. He left his boat and seven of his crew at Apocant, the highest town on the river in the upper part of what is today the lake. Two crew members departed with Smith and two Chickahominy guides in a borrowed canoe. Twenty miles or so above Apocant, Smith was captured by a group of many bowmen from several tribes which he took to be a hunting party. Smith remained in the custody of paramount chief Powhatan for a month before returning to Jamestown.

Sustaining the Chickahominy Tribe
Following the loss of their original land on the Chickahominy River to the English, many Chickahominy Indians eventually settled in this area. Today the Tribal Center stands as the cultural and geographic center of the modern Chickahominy Tribe.

Chickahominy Water Trail and Captain John Smithís Voyages
Learn more about the Capt. John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail and Chickahominy culture by visiting exhibits at Riverís Rest Marina, Chickahominy Riverfront Park and Rockahock Campground.

This interpretive sign was created by the James River Association with the assistance of Charles City County, New Kent County, James City County, the Chickahominy Tribe, the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, the Virginia Council on
John Smith Captured by Virginia Indians Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, December 15, 2012
2. John Smith Captured by Virginia Indians Marker
Indians, and the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. For more information contact the James River Association at (804) 788-8811 or visit www.jamesriverassociation.org. Find more information on following Captain Smithís explorations of Virginia at www.johnsmithtrail.org and tracing his voyages around the Chesapeake Bay at www.smithtrail.net.

 
Erected by James River Association.
 
Location. 37° 24.732′ N, 77° 7.524′ W. Marker is near Providence Forge, Virginia, in Charles City County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Lot Cary Road (Virginia Route 602) and Samaria Lane, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at the Chickahominy Tribal Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8200 Lot Cary Rd, Providence Forge VA 23140, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Action of Nance's Shop (approx. 1.9 miles away); Old Quaker Settlement - Adkins Store (approx. 2 miles away); Stuart's Ride (approx. 2.5 miles away); Roxbury (approx. 2.6 miles away); Barnetts (approx. 3.7 miles away); Lott Cary Birthplace (approx. 4.4 miles away); Long Bridge (approx. 4.5 miles away); Letitia Christian Tyler (approx. 4.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker.
Chickahominty Tribal Center image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, December 15, 2012
3. Chickahominty Tribal Center
(captions)
The Chickahominy Tribe and the English enter into a treaty in 1614. Image courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society
An early inter-tribal gathering during a cultural revival amongst Virginia Indians in the early 1900s. Image courtesy of the Library of Virginia
Tribal members participate in a ceremonial tribute to the State of Virginia in 1919. Image courtesy of the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Chief Stephen Adkins advocates for Virginia Indians and the Chickahominy Tribe. Image courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution.
Dancers at the annual Chickahominy Pow-Wow celebrate heritage and share traditions. Image courtesy of Robert Llewellyn.
 
Also see . . .
1. James River Association. (Submitted on December 16, 2012.)
2. Captain John Smith's Trail. (Submitted on December 16, 2012.)
3. Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail. (Submitted on December 16, 2012.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraExplorationNative Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 16, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 514 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 16, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement