Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alexandria, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Prehistory to Colonial Settlement

 
 
Prehistory to Colonial Settlement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 7, 2012
1. Prehistory to Colonial Settlement Marker
Inscription. Jones Point was once a wooded wilderness, ringed by marshes and periodically cut off from the mainland during high tide. American Indians made use of both woodland and wetland for food, tools and supplies. By the 17th century, Europeans had displaced the native peoples, felled the trees and planted row upon row of tobacco.

Attracted to the seasonal resources of the river, woods and marsh made available by the warming climates that followed the last Ice Age, a small group of native peoples left their inland villages in the spring to establish hunting and fishing camps on Jones Point.

European colonists were required to “seat” their land patents by planting tobacco. Stafford County planter John Alexander—an early owner of Jones Point—arranged for tenant farmers (including Charles Jones, for whom Jones Point was named) and crews of enslaved African Americans to work the remote farm.

A Tobacco inspection station established near the foot of what is now Oronoco Street became the genesis of the active town of Alexandria in 1749.

(sidebar)
Ice Age
During the last Ice Age, glaciers locked away massive amounts of seawater in ice. Low sea levels exposed more land and enlarged the footprint of Jones Point.

Post Ice Age
Warming climates
This Marker is the first (leftmost) of three markers in this location. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 7, 2012
2. This Marker is the first (leftmost) of three markers in this location.
melted the glaciers after the last Ice Age. Rising sea levels created a tidally-flooded marsh (pocosin) that separated Jones Point from the mainland.

Historic Period
Sea levels continued to rise, but sedimentation gradually added land to Jones Point. In 1794, Alexandrians reinforced what may have been a slender, natural causeway permanently reconnecting Jones Point to the mainland.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 38° 47.536′ N, 77° 2.547′ W. Marker is in Alexandria, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Jones Point Drive 0.2 miles east of South Royal Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located near a playground in Jones Point Park. Marker is in this post office area: Alexandria VA 22314, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Emerging Nation (here, next to this marker); World Wars to the Present (here, next to this marker); World War I-Era Rudder (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Lost Village of Cameron at Great Hunting Creek (about 600 feet away); Mistress Margaret Brent (about 700 feet away); The Remarkable Margaret Brent (about 700 feet away); The Jones Point Lighthouse (about 700 feet away); Mountains of Materials and Massive Manpower (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alexandria.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. These three markers jointly tell the history of Jones Point.
 
Categories. Colonial EraNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 21, 2012, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 470 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 21, 2012, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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