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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Dinwiddie in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Final Stand

 
 
A Final Stand Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
1. A Final Stand Marker
Inscription. With their left at the Angle crashed and their center near the Five Forks intersection overrun, the Confederates made a final stand here, in and around Gilliamís field. Across the open ground to your right, Brig. Gen. George Armstrong Custer led two Union cavalry brigades in a wild charge against the Confederate right flank. Southern horsemen under Maj. Gen. W.H.F. Lee held off the Federals.

Across the road to your left, infantrymen of Brig. Gen. Montgomery Corseís Virginia brigade struggled against an attack by Union infantry moving westward (toward you) along the White Oak Road. Though Corseís troops were overrun, their efforts allowed Pickettís remaining 7,000 men to escape to the north. Pickettís survivors would not rejoin the main Confederate army until three days later at Amelia Court House.

The defeat at Five Forks forced Lee to abandon the Petersburg lines – and hence the capital at Richmond. Eight days later, caught in a vise pf Union troops, Lee surrendered his army at Appomattox Court House.
 
Erected by Petersburg National Battlefield, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 37° 8.401′ N, 77° 38.316′ W. Marker is near Dinwiddie, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County
A Final Stand Marker and Gilliamís field image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
2. A Final Stand Marker and Gilliamís field
Across this field charged Gen. George A. Custer's calvarymen against the Confederate right flank.
. Marker is on White Oak Road (Virginia Route 613), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. The marker is in the Five Forks Unit of Petersburg National Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Dinwiddie VA 23841, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Death of Pegram (approx. 0.8 miles away); Digging In (approx. 0.8 miles away); Battle of Five Forks (approx. 0.9 miles away); Five Forks Battlefield (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Five Forks (approx. 0.9 miles away); Crawfordís Sweep (approx. 0.9 miles away); "Advanced...repulsed...charged again..." (approx. one mile away); The Union Cavalry Attacks (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dinwiddie.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker includes a picture of the Union cavalry attack with the caption Custerís cavalry attacking the Confederate right, here at Gilliamís field.

The upper right of the marker features a map of the Confederate fortifications at Five Forks. The Union attacks and the Confederate retreat are indicated.
 
Also see . . .
1. Five Forks Unit. Petersburg National Battlefield (Submitted on March 15, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Five Forks
A Final Stand Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 20, 2010
3. A Final Stand Marker
Five Forks Battlefield Tour Stop #4
. The Civil War Siege of Petersburg. (Submitted on December 21, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryWar, US Civil
 
Battle map of the Final Stand image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
4. Battle map of the Final Stand
This map shows the Confederate fortifications at Five Forks. The marker is located at the bottom of the map near the Confederate retreat.
Five Forks Intersection image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
5. Five Forks Intersection
The Five Forks intersection was the objective of the Union attack on April 1, 1865. With its fall, and the subsequent fall of the South Side Railroad, Lee was forced to evacuate Petersburg and Richmond, and begin his retreat to Appomattox.
The Confederate Right Flank image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 20, 2010
6. The Confederate Right Flank
View towards the direction of the Union cavalry charge
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 15, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,304 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 15, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on August 8, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   4, 5. submitted on March 15, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6. submitted on January 25, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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