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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
St. Inigoes in St. Mary's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Union's Defense

 
 
The Union's Defense Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 23, 2011
1. The Union's Defense Marker
Inscription.
Potomac Flotilla Created to Protect Chesapeake Tidelands

Maryland, especially Southern Maryland, was not "neutral" in the Civil War. The U.S. Navy realized early in the conflict that the Potomac River was both a conduit for attacks to the north, and a gateway for supplies to the Confederacy. The Union needed control of the Potomac River to protect Washington DC, thus a fleet of steam-powered ships was commissioned.

The Potomac Flotilla was created in 1861 to server as: "a flying flotilla...with a view to service in the Chesapeake and its tributaries; to interrupt the enemy's communications; assured keep open our own; drive from those waters every hostile bottom; threaten all points of a shore line accessible to such force exceeding 1,000 miles in extent; protect loyal citizens; convoy, tow, transport troops or intelligence with dispatch; be generally useful; threaten all points , and attack at any important one." Commander James H. Ward, creator of the Potomac Flotilla April 1861

The Potomac Flotilla's USS Tulip

Originally built in 1862 for the Chinese Ever-Victorious Army, the Chi Kiang's hull was laid by Master ship builder James C. Jewett of New York. Daniel McLeod supplied a single horizontal direct-acting (compound) engine and two horizontal return tubular boilers without
The Union's Defense Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 23, 2011
2. The Union's Defense Marker
steam drums. This lack of steam drums would ultimately lead to the vessel's destruction.

On June 22,1863, the Chi Kiang was purchased by the US Navy, classed as a screw steamer, fourth rate gunboat, and commissioned the USS Tulip. Her profile was altered to help evade detection by the enemy, and she was fitted with two 24-pound howitzers, two 12-pound smooth bore cannon and one 20-pound parrot rifle. The Tulip was assigned blockading duty with the Potomac Flotilla's First Division.

The Coaling Station at Cross Manor

By Early 1864 the Potomac flotilla established a new coaling station and operational base here at Cross Manor in St. Inigoes on the St. Mary's river.
 
Location. 38° 9.733′ N, 76° 25.45′ W. Marker is in St. Inigoes, Maryland, in St. Mary's County. Marker can be reached from Cross Manor Road. Touch for map. The marker is at the end of a grassy lane running north from Cross Manor Road just east of the gates of Cornwaleys' Cross Manor. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Inigoes MD 20684, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Disaster at Ragged Point (a few steps from this marker); The Tulip Disaster (a few steps from this marker); USS Tulip Monument
Coaling Station at Cross Manor image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 23, 2011
3. Coaling Station at Cross Manor
(a few steps from this marker); St. Ignatius Church (approx. 0.8 miles away); John LaFarge, S.J. (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Manor of Cornwaleys’ Cross (approx. 1.3 miles away); Mattapany Street (approx. 1.5 miles away); Fear of War, People of Peace (approx. 1.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Inigoes.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This cluster of markers and monuments tell the story of the USS Tulip and the Potomac Flotilla.
 
Categories. War, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
USS Fuschia image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 23, 2011
4. USS Fuschia
While no known photos of USS Tulip exist, she was reported to be similar in appearance to her sister ship, the USS Fuschia, pictured here ca. 1863-65.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 27, 2012, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 277 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 27, 2012, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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