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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

63rd Infantry Division

 
 
63rd Infantry Division Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 16, 2011
1. 63rd Infantry Division Marker
Inscription.
Ardennes / Alsace
Rhineland
Central Europe
1944 - 1945
In Honor Of The More Than 1000 Men Of The
63RD Infantry Division
Who Gave Their Lives So That
We May Live Free
Dedicated to their fallen comrades by the men of
the 63rd Infantry Division Association 1997

 
Location. 38° 52.717′ N, 77° 4.15′ W. Marker is in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, in Arlington County. Marker is on Grant Drive near McClellan Drive, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located in Arlington National Cemetery, Section 7, with a Memorial Pin Oak Tree. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Myer VA 22211, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chaplains Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); 173d Airborne Brigade (Sep) (within shouting distance of this marker); Swiss Internees (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. Secret Army in the Kingdom of Laos. (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); U.S. Navy Cruiser Sailors Association (about 400 feet away); Sailors, Coast Guardsmen and Marines of African and Asian-Pacific Descent
63rd Infantry Division Marker and Memorial Pin Oak Tree image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 16, 2011
2. 63rd Infantry Division Marker and Memorial Pin Oak Tree
(about 400 feet away); U.S.S. Houston and H.M.A.S. Perth (about 400 feet away); American Ex-Prisoners of War (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Arlington National Cemetery.
 
Also see . . .  The 63d Infantry Division ("Blood and Fire", Wikipedia entry. After bitter fighting at Güdingen early in March (1945), the division smashed at the Siegfried Line on 15th at Saarbrücken, Germany, taking Ormesheim and finally breaching the line at Sankt Ingbert and Hassel on 20 March. Hard still fighting lay ahead, but the Siegfried Line was Germany's last attempt to defend its prewar boundaries along the western front; this was a significant moment in the 63rd Infantry's history. Before resting on 23 March, the 63d took Spiesen-Elversberg, Neunkirchen and Erbach. From then until the end of the war, the 63rd Division carved a path of “blood and fire” from Sarreguemines through Germany. On 28 March, the division crossed the Rhine at Lampertheim, moved to Viernheim and captured Heidelberg on 30th. Continuing the advance, the 63d crossed the Neckar River near Mosbach and the Jagst River. Heavy resistance slowed the attack on Adelsheim, Möckmühl, and Bad Wimpfen. (Submitted on January 3, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 3, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 306 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 3, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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