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Salt Lake City in Salt Lake County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Grave of Brigham Young

Prophet - Pioneer - Statesman

 
 
Grave of Brigham Young Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert Cole, January 17, 2013
1. Grave of Brigham Young Marker
Inscription.
Born June 1, 1801, at Whitingham, Vermont
Died August 29, 1877, at Salt Lake City, Utah

Brigham Young, second President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints succeeded Joseph Smith, founder of the Church, who was martyred at Carthage, Illinois. He was chosen as leader of the people in 1844 and sustained as President of the Church December 27, 1847.
Earlier that year he led the Mormon Pioneers from Winter Quarters (Omaha) to the Salt Lake Valley, arriving here July 24. In 1849 he became Governor of the Provisional State of Deseret and in 1850 Governor of the Territory of Utah.
This tablet erected in honor of their beloved leader by the Young Men's and Young Women's Mutual Improvement Associations, which were organized under his direction.
 
Erected 1938 by Utah Pioneer Trails and Landmarks Association. (Marker Number 78.)
 
Location. 40° 46.201′ N, 111° 53.132′ W. Marker is in Salt Lake City, Utah, in Salt Lake County. Marker is on East First Avenue east of North State Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 140 East 1st Avenue, Salt Lake City UT 84103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Eagle Gate 1859 (about
Gravesite of Brigham Young image. Click for full size.
By Robert Cole, January 17, 2013
2. Gravesite of Brigham Young
700 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Private School House (about 700 feet away); The Bee-Hive House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Beehive House (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Lion House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Brigham Young’s Office (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Lion House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Social Hall (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Salt Lake City.
 
More about this marker. Grave site and marker are located at the Brigham Young Family Memorial Cemetery, within a fenced area that may be locked.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mormon Pioneer Memorial Monument. A memorial for the Mormon Pioneers (Submitted on February 9, 2013, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.) 

2. Brigham Young. Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on February 9, 2013, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.) 

3. Houses of Brigham Young. (Submitted on February 9, 2013, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.)
4. Brigham Young Biography. (Submitted on February 9, 2013, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.)
Brigham Young Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Robert Cole, January 17, 2013
3. Brigham Young Memorial

 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.Settlements & Settlers
 
Brigham Young Statue Reading the Book of Mormon to Children image. Click for full size.
By Robert Cole, January 17, 2013
4. Brigham Young Statue Reading the Book of Mormon to Children
Brigham Young image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
5. Brigham Young
This c. 1875 lithograph of Brigham Young by Hartwig Bornemann hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Brigham Young converted to Mormonism in 1832 and gradually rose in the leadership structure until he became the head of the Twelve Apostles under Joseph Smith. After Smith's murder by an anti­Mormon mob in 1844, Young assumed leadership of the larger portion of the church. In 1847 he led the Mormons from Nebraska to the Great Basin, where he founded Salt Lake City as the new church headquarters. He oversaw the migration of tens of thousands of Mormon converts to the West and the founding of hundreds of settlements. The Mormon majority elected Young as governor, but he was soon replaced by an appointed territorial governor. Political conflicts and challenges to the Mormons' separatist communal and theocratic venture led the United States to dispatch troops to Utah in 1857 and assert federal authority.” — National Portrait Gallery
Mormon Pioneer Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert Cole, January 17, 2013
6. Mormon Pioneer Cemetery Marker
Marker is on the fence closest to the sidewalk in front of the cemetery.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 23, 2013, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This page has been viewed 608 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 23, 2013, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.   2, 3, 4. submitted on February 9, 2013, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.   5. submitted on October 17, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6. submitted on February 9, 2013, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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