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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Logan Circle in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Neighborhood Reborn

Logan Circle

 

—National Mall & Memorial Parks —

 
A Neighborhood Reborn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, February 25, 2012
1. A Neighborhood Reborn Marker
Inscription.
The Logan Circle Historic District has a rich history of change. A fashionable, exclusive neighborhood had evolved by the 1870s – home to members of Congress, such as Senator John Logan of Illinois. By the turn of the 20th century, Iowa – later Logan – Circle flourished as a social intellectual, and artistic hub of Black Washington. Over time, economic hardships and civil unrest contributed to a decline in the neighborhood’s appearance. Today, this vibrant historic district thrives as the city’s best-preserved example of late 19th-century Victorian architecture clustered around one of L’Enfant’s great open spaces.

[Illustration Captions:]

[Portion of L’Enfant‘s plan for the District of Columbia] Originally purchased in 1791 by Samuel Blodgett, this land served as an “executioner’s square” (right) during the Civil War. The 1864 addition of a horse-drawn trolley line along 14th Street increased the accessibility and desirability of what became known as Iowa Circle.

[Photo of Mary Mcleod Bethune] The National Council of Negro Women, founded by Mary McLeod Bethune, established its headquarters just south of Logan Circle in the 1940s. Other famous residents included boxer Jack Johnson, architect John Lankford, and the family of Duke Ellington.

Logan
A Neighborhood Reborn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, February 25, 2012
2. A Neighborhood Reborn Marker
Circle townhouses about 1890

[Lithograph:‘executioner’s square’] Civil War-era population expansion forced development of this area by the 1870s. A massive city improvement plan induced prominent citizens to construct stately Victorian homes, such as those seen above. In 1901, Civil War veterans erected the Maj. Gen. John A. Logan statue. In 1930 Congress changed the name of Iowa Circle to Logan Circle.

[Aerial photo of Logan Circle] City planners altered Logan Circle in the 1950s by channeling 13th Street through it. Renewed interest throughout the 1970s and 1980s spurred refurbishment of many historic houses and restoration of the circle’s original dimensions. A rich sense of history continues to dominate the entire Logan Circle neighborhood.

Historical Society of Washington, D.C. [photo credits: Victorian townhouse and execution images]; NPS [photo credit, Mary Mcleod Bethune]; Library of Congress [all other photos]
 
Erected 2011 by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 38° 54.573′ N, 77° 1.797′ W. Marker was in Logan Circle, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker could be reached from Rhode Island Avenue,
Missing "Neighborhood Reborn" marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
3. Missing "Neighborhood Reborn" marker
NW (U.S. 29) east of the Logan Circle traffic loop. Touch for map. Marker is off the walkway in the western section of Logan Circle Park which is inside the Logan Circle traffic loop. It is accessible to pedestrians from either the eastern or western extensions of P Street and Rhode Island Avenue - or the northern or southern extensions of 13th Street and Vermont Avenue. Marker was in this post office area: Washington DC 20005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Logan Circle (here, next to this marker); Major General John A. Logan (within shouting distance of this marker); The Artistic Life (within shouting distance of this marker); 6 Logan (within shouting distance of this marker); Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence (within shouting distance of this marker); Pratt House (within shouting distance of this marker); Charles M. “Sweet Daddy” Grace Residence (within shouting distance of this marker); John Logan Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Logan Circle.
 
Also see . . .  Logan Circle. Logan Circle is a traffic circle, neighborhood, and historic district in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. The primarily residential neighborhood includes two historic districts, properties
Label on missing "Neighborhood Reborn" marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
4. Label on missing "Neighborhood Reborn" marker
listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and sites designated D.C. Historic Landmarks. It is the only major circle downtown that remains entirely residential. ... (Submitted on February 27, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Logan Circle Historic District
 
Categories. African AmericansMan-Made FeaturesNotable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
Aerial View of Logan Circle image. Click for full size.
By Carol H. Highsmith, 2008
5. Aerial View of Logan Circle
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 26, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 527 times since then and 34 times this year. Last updated on February 18, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 26, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on February 18, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5. submitted on February 27, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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