Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

A Changing Landscape

 
 
A Changing Landscape Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 9, 2013
1. A Changing Landscape Marker
Inscription. How old is this forest? Prior to the early 1800's Cockspur Island was primarily a grassy salt marsh interspersed with a few, small, forested hammocks. But things were about to change. In 1829 the army began installing drainage canals and a dike system to drain the arsh in order to support the massive weight of Fort Pulaski. In addition the scattered, forested areas were cut to give a clear field of view of any approaching ships or other enemy forces. The army continued to prevent trees from growing on the island during the entire time that Fort Pulaski was occupied. After the military abandoned the fort in the late 1800's, the island once again underwe3nt major changes. Thousands of tons of sand and silt, dredged up from the Savannah River to create a deeper shippng channel, were placed along the shore of Cockspur Island. Trees and grush began growing on this higher ground and the maritime forest that you see before you began to emerge. Several important and interesting historical structures are located along this 1/4-mile long nature trail.
 
Erected by Nationoal Park Service.
 
Location. 32° 1.71′ N, 80° 53.548′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tybee Island GA 31328, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
A Changing Landscape Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 9, 2013
2. A Changing Landscape Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Wesley (1703-1791) (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Cockspur Island Lighthouse (about 300 feet away); John Wesley Landing Site (about 400 feet away); The Waving Girl (about 400 feet away); Cisterns of the Construction Village (about 400 feet away); Burial Sites of Immortal 600 (about 400 feet away); Immortal Six Hundred (about 400 feet away); History of Emancipation: (about 500 feet away).
 
Categories. Agriculture
 
Battery Hambright image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 9, 2013
3. Battery Hambright
Cockspur Island saw one more military use after the War Between the States. During the Spanish American War, a small force was garrisoned here to protect the river mouth. They operated the controls for electric mines in the Savannah River, and manned guns in Fort Pulaski's demilune, and here, on the left, at Battery Hambright.
Battery Hambright image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 9, 2013
4. Battery Hambright
Named after Horace George Habright, a young officer who died on the North Dakota frontier in 1896, this battery's three-inch guns helped guard the approach to the Savannah harbor during the Spanish American War.
Battery Hambright image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 8, 2013
5. Battery Hambright
Ditches and Dikes image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 9, 2013
6. Ditches and Dikes
Historic Dike image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 8, 2013
7. Historic Dike
One of the first tasks the Army Corps of Engineers had to accomplish in order to build Fort Pulaski on the unstale marshlands of Cockspur Island was to construct an earthen dike to prevent flooding. The historic earthen dike is approximately two miles in circumference and twelve feet above sea level. It is still effective today in preventing high tides from submerging Cockspur Island.
A Changing Landscape image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 9, 2013
8. A Changing Landscape
A Changing Landscape image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 9, 2013
9. A Changing Landscape
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 10, 2013, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 279 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on March 10, 2013, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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