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St. Simons Island in Glynn County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

A Clash Of Cultures

 
 
A Clash Of Cultures Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 20, 2008
1. A Clash Of Cultures Marker
Inscription. The skirmish at Bloody Marsh was more than a battle. It was a clash of cultures - each vying for control of what is now the southeastern United States.
Soldiers from Hispanic colonies in the New World fought under the Spanish banner, with the help of Indians and emancipated blacks from Florida. British defenders included English and Scottish immigrants and friendly Southeastern Indians. The British coalition fought effectively, and defeated the invading Spanish army of St. Simon Island.
 
Erected by Fort Frederica National Monument.
 
Location. 31° 9.398′ N, 81° 22.772′ W. Marker is in St. Simons Island, Georgia, in Glynn County. Marker is on Demere Road. Touch for map. This marker is located in the Blood Marsh Unit of the Fort Fredericka National Monument. The unit is located on Demere Rd., south of Stewart St. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Simons Island GA 31522, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Bloody Marsh (within shouting distance of this marker); Demere Road (approx. 0.6 miles away); S.S. Oklahoma and Esso Baton Rouge (approx. 0.9 miles away); Retreat Plantation
A Clash Of Cultures Marker, and Marble Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 20, 2008
2. A Clash Of Cultures Marker, and Marble Monument
see nearby markers for Battle of Bloody Marsh
(approx. 1.4 miles away); St. Simons Park (approx. 1.5 miles away); Fort Saint Simons (approx. 1.5 miles away); Delegal's Fort (approx. 1.5 miles away); Old Spanish Garden (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Simons Island.
 
More about this marker. At the upper right of the marker is a map with the following caption: For nearly 160 years, England and Spain claimed this "disputed" land between Georgia and Florida. The Spanish defeat on St. Simons Island in the summer of 1741 finally settled the issue.
 
Also see . . .
1. History - St. Simons Island. English-Spanish Invasion (Submitted on October 24, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. The Colony of Georgia also had itís own Rangers. Georgiaís founder, General James Oglethorpe, established several Ranger Units among his militia. In 1733 General Oglethorpe, settled in Georgia and saw the need for a militia to protect the colonies against the native Indians and the Spanish. He sought the wood-wise and unconventional fighters to form The Georgia Coastal Rangers and Highland Mounted Rangers.

In July of 1742, Spanish forces sailed from St. Augustine and
A Clash Of Cultures Marker, The disputed area image. Click for full size.
By Fort Frederica Nat. Mon.
3. A Clash Of Cultures Marker, The disputed area
landed near St. Simons Island. General Oglethorpe quickly led his militia consisting of British troops and Rangers and friendly Indians. On July 7th 1742, the Georgia Rangers were guarding the town of Frederica on St. Simons and spotted a force of more than one hundred Spanish troops approaching. General Oglethorpe led a force composed of Highlander Rangers, Coastal Rangers and Indians against the Spaniards in a battle at Gully Hole Creek. The Georgia force was victorious after a fierce one-hour fight, leaving the Spaniards with losses of over one-third of their men and all of their officer corp killed or captured. The Rangers lost one man to heat exhaustion. Later in the day the Spanish landed two hundred elite Grenadiers and crossed the open marsh, to the battle known as the Battle of Bloody Marsh. After two hours of expending ammunition at men that would hide and shoot, the Spanish withdrew not knowing that they severely outnumbered the Georgia Militia. After this encounter, the Spanish would completely withdraw from Georgia never to invade again. (Submitted on October 24, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansColonial EraHispanic AmericansNative Americans
 
Battle of Bloody Marsh Battle Site - A Clash Of Cultures image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, /2008
4. Battle of Bloody Marsh Battle Site - A Clash Of Cultures
A Clash Of Cultures Marker, Cuban Grenadier (Spanish) image. Click for full size.
By Fort Frederica Nat, Mon.
5. A Clash Of Cultures Marker, Cuban Grenadier (Spanish)
Elite, tough, grenade-bearing soldiers, the Grenadiers (recruited in Havana) were the mainstay of the Spanish invasion force. Although experienced fighters, they were the victims of the ambush at Bloody Marsh.
A Clash Of Cultures Marker, Spanish Black Soldiers image. Click for full size.
By Fort Frederica Nat. Mon.
6. A Clash Of Cultures Marker, Spanish Black Soldiers
These former slaves in the English Colony were offered emancipation if they converted to Catholicism and served the Spanish Crown as soldiers. Several hundred of these black troops participated in the Spanish invasion of St. Simons Island.
A Clash Of Cultures Marker, Southeastern Indians image. Click for full size.
By Fort Frederica Nat. Mon.
7. A Clash Of Cultures Marker, Southeastern Indians
Local Indians fought for both sides. These with the British were especially effective in launching raid against Spanish outpost guards and disappearing without a trace.
A Clash Of Cultures Marker, British 42nd ( Oglethorpe's) Regiment image. Click for full size.
By Fort Frederica Nat. Mom.
8. A Clash Of Cultures Marker, British 42nd ( Oglethorpe's) Regiment
Recruited by Georgia's founder James Edward Oglethorpe, these soldiers manned both Fort Frederica and Fort St, Simons. Spanish leaders planned to defeat the troops before moving up the coast to Savannah and other settlements in Georgia and South Carolina. They failed.
A Clash Of Cultures Marker.Scottish Independent Highland Company image. Click for full size.
By Fort Frederica Nat. Mon.
9. A Clash Of Cultures Marker.Scottish Independent Highland Company
These kilted militia men led the British ambush at Bloody Marsh. Recruited by Georgia's trustees to help settle the new colony, they were known as courageous and hard-fighting troops - the heroes of Bloody Marsh.
Markers at the Blood Marsh Unit of the Fort Fredericka National Monument image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, March 20, 2013
10. Markers at the Blood Marsh Unit of the Fort Fredericka National Monument
NPS sign located on Demere Rd. (looking north) image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, March 20, 2013
11. NPS sign located on Demere Rd. (looking north)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 24, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,245 times since then and 63 times this year. Last updated on March 23, 2013, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on October 24, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   10, 11. submitted on March 23, 2013, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.
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