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Tenleytown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Reno

Top of the Town

 

—Tenleytown Heritage Trail —

 
Fort Reno Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
1. Fort Reno Marker
Inscription. To your right is "Point Reno" the highest point in Washington -- 409 feet above sea level, to be exact.

This unsurpassed vantage brought the Civil War (1861-1865) to Tenleytown. After the Union defeat at Bull Run in July 1861, northern troops took the Dyer farm here to establish Fort Pennsylvania. Soldiers cleared the farmhouse, orchards fields and, as neighbor Ann Forrest Green noted with alarm, "every particle of poultry." The fort, renamed in 1863 to honor Major General Jesse Lee Reno, was one of 68 built to protect the city. In the summer of 1864 Confederate forces knew it was one of the city's strongest defenses, with long-range cannons and a signal tower visible for miles.

On the morning of July 11, 1864, President Lincoln visited Fort Reno. Later that day, lookouts spied the dust of Confederate troops advancing from the north. Some headed this way on Rockville Road (Wisconsin Avenue), but most took the Seventh Street Road (Georgia Avenue), homing in on the apparently weaker Fort Stevens, three miles to the northeast. Luckily, the broiling heat delayed Confederate General Jubal Early's attack. giving defenders time to reinforce Fort Stevens. Fort Reno cavalry meanwhile engaged the advancing enemy only a few block north of here, with both sides suffering casualties. The fort's cannons shelled the enemy nearly
Fort Reno Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
2. Fort Reno Marker
four miles away.

Early's forces lost the ensuing Battle of Fort Stevens, the only Civil War engagement fought in the District of Columbia. Some 30 years later the city erased any remnants of the fort when it constructed an underground water reservoir. The reservoir's red-brick tower -- actually a water tank -- became a tenleytown landmark visible from Virginia.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism D.C.
 
Location. 38° 57.048′ N, 77° 4.647′ W. Marker is in Tenleytown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Chesapeake Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. The marker is along Chesapeake Street east of its intersection with 40th Street on the south edge of Fort Reno Park. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20016, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Civil War Defenses of Washington (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Fort Reno (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Reno (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Three R's (about 800 feet away); Suburban Style (approx. 0.2 miles away); In Touch with the World
Fort Pennsylvania image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
3. Fort Pennsylvania
Fort Pennsylvania soon to be Fort Reno, sketched in 1862.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); A Country Road (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Spirit of Community (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tenleytown.
 
Also see . . .  Tenelytown Heritage Trail. (Submitted on March 24, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesWar, US Civil
 
General Reno image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
4. General Reno
Major General Jesse Lee Reno, honored by Fort Reno, was mortally wounded in battle at South Mountain, MD, 1862.
Point Reno High Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
5. Point Reno High Point Marker
Signal Tower, Fort Reno D.C. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
6. Signal Tower, Fort Reno D.C.
Fort Reno's signal tower, where soldiers used torches and flags to communicate with Fort Stevens.
Water Tower image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
7. Water Tower
A 1917 view of the first water tower and engineer's house.
Mary Cheh and Ken Faulstich image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
8. Mary Cheh and Ken Faulstich
City Councilmember Mary Cheh and Tenleytown's Ken Faulstich celebrate the 2007 designation of Fort Reno as the city's highest point.
Fort Reno Map image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
9. Fort Reno Map
This map consists of today's street grid overlaid on an 1865 map of Fort Reno and nearby Battery Reno and Battery Russell.
Fugazi image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
10. Fugazi
The DC punk rock band Fugazi performed at Fort Reno in 2002.
Map image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
11. Map
You Are Here.
1903 Water Tower image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 29, 2006
12. 1903 Water Tower
1929 Water Tower image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 29, 2006
13. 1929 Water Tower
Point Reno Highpoint Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 1, 2011
14. Point Reno Highpoint Marker
National Park Service
In cooperation with the D.C. Association of Land Surveyors
And the Highpointers Club Washington D.C.
Point Reno + elevation 409 Feet
2007
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 24, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 24, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 673 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on March 24, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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