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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Rosh Ha'ayin, Central District, Israel
 

Tel Afeq - Antipatris

 
 
Tel Afeq - Antipatris Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
1. Tel Afeq - Antipatris Marker
Inscription. Archaeological excavations at Tel Afeq have exposed layers of occupation dating from the Chalcolithic period (the fourth millennium B.C.E.) until the 20th century C.E. Strategically situated on the "Afeq Pass", a bottleneck between the headwaters of the Yarqon Stream and the range of hills in the east, Afeq controlled the international route that ran from Egypt to the north. Already in the third millennium B.C.E. the city that stood here was encircled by a fortification wall. In the time of the Judges, Afeq was a Philistine base against the Israelites at Eben-ezer (1 Samuel 4). In the Second Temple period Herod built the city of Antipatris, named for his father, on this site. The city lost its importance after the Roman period, but fortresses like the Ottoman "Pinar Basi" (Head of the Spring), whose impressive remains stand until today, continue to guard this strategic pass.
 
Location. 32° 6.317′ N, 34° 55.826′ E. Marker is near Rosh Ha'ayin, Central District. Marker can be reached from Yarkon Park Entrance Roadway just north of National Route 483. Touch for map. This historical marker is located in the interior of Yarkon Park, along a walking path that leads to the entrance of the Ottoman Fortress, just to the right (north) of the southeastern corner
Tel Afeq - Antipatris Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
2. Tel Afeq - Antipatris Marker
Close-up view of the english text portion of the historical marker.
entrance to the fortress. Marker is in this post office area: Rosh Ha'ayin, Central District 48800, Israel.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Roman Cardo (within shouting distance of this marker); The Egyptian Governor's Residence (within shouting distance of this marker).
 
Regarding Tel Afeq - Antipatris. In the December of 2000 edition of the Jewish Magazine (see 2nd related link) they make the following observation, "The park now forms a more fitting background for the antiquities in Tel Afek, although the finds are a bit difficult to find as there are no indicating signs. This is a pity because now it would be easy to miss that Tel Afek is one of the most important biblical places in Israel."

I confess that when I visited this site, with my tour group, in March of 2013, I was disappointed that there weren't more historical markers to help explain the importance of the site and to mark where the archaeological evidence of this important site could be found. I only managed to find three markers, but because I was with a tour group I had a limited amount of time to search for additional markers.

The ruins of the Ottoman fortress are by far the most visually significant and impressive archaeological evidence at this site. But
Tel Afeq - Antipatris Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
3. Tel Afeq - Antipatris Marker
View of the historical marker near the southeast entrance to the Ottoman fortress.
I didn't come to this location to see Ottoman era ruins, I came because the Book of Acts detailed the Apostle Paul's brief visit to this site on his way to the Caesarea Maritima (see Acts 23: 31). I was looking for Roman ruins that dated back to the time of Paul's visit.

I was initially disappointed in my quest to see and experience the Roman ruins from the time of Paul, but once I could bring myself to look beyond the Ottoman fortress I was able to see two other important groups of ruins. The first were the Roman ruins which are located along the Roman road that runs southeast from the southeastern fortress tower. These Roman ruins aren't nearly as numerous or significant as I had seen in visits to places like Beth Shean or Sepphoris, but I was still pleased to be walking on the very same Roman road that Paul had traveled upon.

Unfortunately, I was unable to see much more of the Roman ruins than what was in the immediate vicinity of the southeast tower of the fortress. Had I more time, I would have liked to have walked to the end of what had been excavated of the Roman road, within the park (see the aerial photograph view of the park that is in the 5th related link).

The second important group of ancient ruins that can be seen at this site are the excavations of the Egyptian Governor's residence, which date back to the Late Bronze Age (1,550-1,200 BC).
Tel Afeq - Antipatris image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
4. Tel Afeq - Antipatris
View looking southeast along the eastern wall of the Ottoman fortress. Both the entrance to the fortress and the historical marker are at the far end of the picture.
I confess that this was just another example for me of a very strong Egyptian presence in the Biblical land of Canaan, during this period of history, that prior to my trip to Israel, I was pretty much unaware of. So I found these ruins to be very significant and insightful to my understanding of the history of this region.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Yarkon Park. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on April 11, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Archaeology in Israel: Tel Afek. This is a link to related information provided by the Jewish Magazine. (Submitted on April 11, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Antipatris. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on April 11, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

4. Aphek, Antipatris. This is a link to information provided by BiblePlaces.com. (Submitted on April 11, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

5. Afek in the Sharon (Antipatris). This is a link to information provided by BibleWalks.com (Submitted on April 11, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.)
Tel Afeq - Antipatris image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
5. Tel Afeq - Antipatris
View of the interior of the Ottoman fortress, looking towards the southwest interior corner of the fortress.
 
 
Categories. AnthropologyForts, CastlesSettlements & Settlers
 
Tel Afeq - Antipatris image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
6. Tel Afeq - Antipatris
View of the interior of the Ottoman fortress, looking towards the northeast interior corner of the fortress.
Tel Afeq - Antipatris image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
7. Tel Afeq - Antipatris
View of the Roman road, located just beyond the southeast fortress tower.
Tel Afeq - Antipatris image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
8. Tel Afeq - Antipatris
View of the ruins of the residence of the Egyptian Governor.
Tel Afeq - Antipatris image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
9. Tel Afeq - Antipatris
View of the southwest exterior corner of the Ottoman fortress.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 11, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 502 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on April 12, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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