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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fifty-First New York Infantry

 
 
51st New York Monument Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
1. 51st New York Monument Inscription
Inscription.
Shepard Rifles
Col. Robert B. Potter
2d Brigade - Ferrero's 2d Division - Sturgis'
9th Army Corps - Burnside's
Army of the Potomac
Sept. 17, 1862

In compliance with orders received from
General Burnside on the morning of September 17,
the 51st New York and the 51st Pennsylvania were
selected to carry this bridge at all hazards.
The 51st New York, with the 51st Pennsylvania
on its right, formed on the ridge in the rear of this
position, moved forward at double quick, and at
One P.M. carried the bridge at the point of the
Bayonet. The passage was obstinately disputed.

Casualties
1 officer and 18 men killed
4 officers and 64 men wounded
Total 87

 
Erected 1908 by State of New York.
 
Location. 39° 27.033′ N, 77° 43.878′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker can be reached from Old Burnside Bridge Road, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Located to the east of stop 9 (Burnside Bridge) of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield, along the walking trail east of the bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within
51st New York Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
2. 51st New York Monument
walking distance of this marker. Sturgis's Division, Ninth Army Corps (here, next to this marker); Ninth Army Corps (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Ninth Army Corps (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Ninth Army Corps (here, next to this marker); Witness to History (here, next to this marker); 51st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 2nd Maryland Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); We Showered the Lead Across that Creek (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fifty-First New York Infantry Monument. National Park Service page detailing the monument. (Submitted on March 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 51st New York Infantry, 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, IX Corps. Private Orlando Caruana of Company K was awarded the Medal of Honor for actions at the Battle of South Mountain (Fox's Gap). (Submitted on March 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Monument and Tablet Cluster on East End of Burnside Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Monument and Tablet Cluster on East End of Burnside Bridge
From left to right are the Ninth Army Corps Tablet for September 15-16 (Number 56), Ninth Army Corps Tablet for 17 September (Number 57), The 51st New York Monument, Sturgis' Division (Number 58), and Ferrero's Brigade Tablet (Number 68)
Fifty-First New York Infantry Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 1977
4. Fifty-First New York Infantry Monument
Prior to restoration.
The Charge of the 51st New York and 51st Pennsylvania image. Click for full size.
By Edwin Forbes (artist)
5. The Charge of the 51st New York and 51st Pennsylvania
Edwin Forbes sketched this illustration of the dramatic charge of the two regiments that finally carried the Lower, or Burnside, Bridge. Note the two sets of colors, indicating the New Yorkers on the left and the Pennsylvanians on the right.
Similar View of the Bridge Today image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
6. Similar View of the Bridge Today
The two regiments formed behind Nagle's Brigade, then rushed forward onto the bridge, side by side. Note the small tree in Forbes' drawing which stood next to the wall on the near side landing of the bridge. That tree has grown substantially, and survives as a witness to the battle, seen in the break of the stone wall at the bridge abutment.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 29, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 769 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on April 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on November 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5, 6. submitted on March 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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