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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Hunter in Montgomery County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Building Block of the Erie Canal

 
 
Building Block of the Erie Canal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, July 14, 2012
1. Building Block of the Erie Canal Marker
Inscription.
Limestone was used to build locks, aqueducts, and other features throughout New York State's canal system both because of its availability and its durability. This limestone block was a capstone from the Schoharie Aqueduct.

Local limestone formed under a sea that covered much of New York State over 450 million years ago. The remains of marine animals became shell-rich sediment on the sea floor. During a process called cementation, the mineral calcite formed crystals in the spaces between the loose sediment grains, "gluing" them together to create the limestone.

The stone before you was a capstone over one of the arches in the aqueduct. It was retrieved from Schoharie Creek.

[Inset Map Caption]
Lake Iroquois about 12,000 years ago
Around 12,000 years ago at the end of the last ice age, melting ice created Lake Iroquois, a predecessor to Lake Ontario. The lake's water flowed eastward in a great deluge, carving out the Mohawk Valley and exposing layers of limestone, making it available for later use on the canal.

 
Erected by New York State.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Erie Canal marker series.
 
Location. 42° 56.367′ N, 74° 16.918′ 
Building Block of the Erie Canal Marker and Aqueduct Cap Stone image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, July 14, 2012
2. Building Block of the Erie Canal Marker and Aqueduct Cap Stone
W. Marker is in Fort Hunter, New York, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Schoharie Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is beside the entrance to the Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site visitors center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 129 Schoharie Street, Fort Hunter NY 12069, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Original Erie Canal (a few steps from this marker); Site of Queen Anne Chapel (a few steps from this marker); East Guard Lock (a few steps from this marker); The Fort by the Village (a few steps from this marker); Site of Last Mohawk Indian Village (a few steps from this marker); Site of Old Fort Hunter (a few steps from this marker); Site of First Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); A Mohawk House Unearthed (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Hunter.
 
Also see . . .  New York State Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation:Schoharie Crossing State Historic. (Submitted on April 21, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsMan-Made FeaturesWaterways & Vessels
 
Building Block of the Erie Canal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, July 14, 2012
3. Building Block of the Erie Canal Marker
The Building Block Marker and the Schoharie Creek Aqueduct Cap Stone are on the lawn beside the entrance to the Visitor's Center at the Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site.
Building Block of the Erie Canal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
4. Building Block of the Erie Canal Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a photograph showing the nearby aqueduct that once carried the canal and towpath over Schoharie Creek.
Erie Canal Aqueduct image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
5. Erie Canal Aqueduct
Present day view, of the nearby remains, of the aqueduct that once carried the canal and towpath over Schoharie Creek.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 20, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 345 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 20, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   4, 5. submitted on September 13, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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