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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pueblo in Pueblo County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Fort Pueblo

Site of Indian Massacre

 

—Dec 25, 1854 —

 
Fort Pueblo Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2013
1. Fort Pueblo Monument
Inscription. This memorial commemorating the Old Pueblo Fort Site erected by The Arkansas Valley & Pueblo Chapters, Daughters of the American Revolution. Dedicated Nov. 17, 1923.

On Christmas Day, 1854, a massacre occurred at Fort Pueblo on the Arkansas. The fifteen men of the fort were killed and one woman (Chepita) and two boys carried away by the Indians.
 
Erected 1923 by The Arkansas Valley and Pueblo Chapters, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 38° 16.083′ N, 104° 36.618′ W. Marker is in Pueblo, Colorado, in Pueblo County. Marker is at the intersection of West 1st Street and Court Street, on the right when traveling west on West 1st Street. Touch for map. It is in front of the Pueblo Palace Ice Arena. Marker is in this post office area: Pueblo CO 81003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Teresita Sandoval (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Borderland - Pueblo / Railroads - Pueblo Country (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Mormon Battalion (approx. 0.9 miles away); Jacob Fowler's Lookout - Fountain City
Fort Pueblo Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2013
2. Fort Pueblo Monument
(approx. one mile away); San Carlos de los Jupes (approx. 8.3 miles away); Pueblo - Trail Days / Industrial Frontier - Pinon County (approx. 12.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. The current marker appears to be a new replacement of the 1926 marker and does not have the second paragraph text on it. The original stone monument and its full text is described on page 81 of the Junann Stieghorst’s 1978 Colorado Historical Markers.
 
Regarding Fort Pueblo. The entry in the 1978 book Colorado Historical Markers by Junann Stieghorst reports that this monument was originally located west of City Hall on City Hall Place, but was moved to this location because the original site was not the site of Fort Pueblo.
 
Also see . . .  The Massacre at Old Fort El Pueblo. F.W. Cragin’s 1908 account of the massacre. “On a spot now in the heart of the City of Pueblo, Colorado, and which was then just outside of the limit of the Republic of Mexico—a spot not far from the left bank of the Arkansas river, but whose close vicinity that fickle stream has now long since forsaken—a small colony of Americans, in 1842, built and occupied an adobe-walled fort, as a place of domicile, farming and trading. ...” (Submitted on April 24, 2013.) 
 
Additional comments.
Image of Fort Pueblo Etched on the Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2013
3. Image of Fort Pueblo Etched on the Monument

1. “El Pueblo Christmas Tragedy 1854”
Text of brass plaque in the lobby of the El Pueblo History Museum nearby. Plaque includes bas relief of the fort.

In MEMORY and RECOGNITION of those courageous Hispanics of Mejicano heritage, who along with Native Americans lost their lives on Christmas 1854.

Juan Shoco-Aragón • Rumaldo Córdoba • Estanislado (Tanislado) de Luna • Juan Blas Martín • Chepita Miera (captured and killed) • Juan Rafael Medina • José Francisco Mestas • Joaquín Pacheco • Felix Sandoval (captured and released) • José Benito Sandoval • Juan Isidro Sandoval (captured and released) • José Ignacio Valencia • Guadalupe Vigil (Navajo Indian)

Fray Angélico Chávez Hispanic Genealogical Society of Southern Colorado. This project was partially funded by a state historical fund grants award from the Colorado Historical Society.
    — Submitted April 24, 2013, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 24, 2013, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 943 times since then and 145 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 24, 2013, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo of the original monument • Photo of the plaque quoted in Comment 1 and of its environs in the museum • Can you help?
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