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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
near Stantonsburg in Greene County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Peacock's Bridge

 
 
Peacock's Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2013
1. Peacock's Bridge Marker
Inscription.
Here Lt. Col. Tarleton's
British dragoons and
Colonel James Gorham's
militia engaged in a
skirmish, May, 1781.

 
Erected 2003 by North Carolina Office of Archives and History. (Marker Number F-31.)
 
Location. 35° 35.139′ N, 77° 48.689′ W. Marker is in near Stantonsburg, North Carolina, in Greene County. Marker is on State Highway 58, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located on the southern side of Contentnea Creek at the Greene - Wilson County Line. Marker is in this post office area: Stantonsburg NC 27883, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Nuclear Mishap (approx. 4.7 miles away); James Glasgow (approx. 7.1 miles away); Nooherooka (approx. 8.9 miles away); Toisnot Church (approx. 10.4 miles away); Charles B. Aycock (approx. 10.7 miles away); Owen L. W. Smith (approx. 10.8 miles away); R.D.W. Connor (approx. 11 miles away); First ABC Store (approx. 11 miles away).
 
Regarding Peacock's Bridge. Samuel Peacock built a toll bridge prior to 1751 in present-day Stantonsburg in Wilson County. Peacock’s Bridge provided a way of passage
Peacock's Bridge Marker on North Carolina Route 58, here looking south image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2013
2. Peacock's Bridge Marker on North Carolina Route 58, here looking south
across Contentnea Creek. On May 6, 1781, it was the site of a skirmish between Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton’s British dragoons and Col. James Gorham’s militia.
   After crossing the Neuse River, Col. Tarleton’s men met about 400 militiamen waiting for them at the
bridge. Tarleton’s forces dispersed the militia, but not without taking some losses, and headed on toward
Tarboro.
   Gen. Jethro Sumner filed a report to Gen. Nathanael Greene, indicating, “The best accounts we have had of the enemy’s march towards this quarter, say that about 800 were at Peacock’s Bridge on Cotentney in the road leading to Tarborough that they had put to route a part of Militia of about 400,
under Col. Gorum by a party of Tarleton’s horse and fifty Tories. The people are moving before them; most of the public stores here, I flatter myself, will be moved off, and out of the way.” (North Carolina Office of Archives & History — Department of Cultural Resources)
 
Also see . . .  Lt. Colonel Banastre Tarleton, the Most Hated Officer in America, by Donald N. Moran. ...Tarleton scored several victories; his first at (S.C.) Monck’s Corner on April 14th, Lenud’s Ferry on May 6th, and the Waxhaws on May 29th, 1780. As a result of his ruthless conduct at these engagements and others, the nicknames "Bloody Tarleton" and "Tarleton’s Quarter" (meaning no quarter) entered the American lexicon.
Peacock's Bridge Marker, looking north at Contentnea Creek, county line image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2013
3. Peacock's Bridge Marker, looking north at Contentnea Creek, county line
... (Submitted on May 4, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Lt. Col.Banastre Tarleton image. Click for full size.
By Sir Joshua Reynolds, `
4. Lt. Col.Banastre Tarleton
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 3, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 365 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 3, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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