Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ninth Army Corps

Welsh's Brigade, Willcox's Division

 
 
Welsh's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Welsh's Brigade Tablet
Inscription.
U.S.A.
Ninth Army Corps.
Welsh's Brigade, Willcox's Division.

Col. Thomas Welsh, 45th Pennsylvania Infantry, Commanding.
Organization.
8th Michigan Infantry,
46th New York Infantry,
45th and 100th Pennsylvania Infantry.
September 17, 1862.

On the morning of the 17th Welsh's Brigade was in reserve on the eastern slope of the ridge on the left bank of the Antietam, nearly opposite the Burnside Bridge. About 2 p.m., after Sturgis' Division had carried the bridge, the brigade crossed and, following the road to Sharpsburg about 250 yards, formed line west of the road.

The brigade then advanced over the high ground west of the road, gradually crossing to the east, until its right was near this point, its center in the ravine and at the stone mill, and its left in the apple orchard beyond, when the attack of A.P. Hill on the left flank of the Corps compelled it to withdraw to the banks of the Antietam, where it remained until the evening of the 18th.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 64.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 27.354′ N, 77° 
Tablets Number 62 and 64 along Rodman Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
2. Tablets Number 62 and 64 along Rodman Avenue
Overlooking the Sherrick Farm House are tablets for Willcox's Division (number 62 on the left) and Welsh's Brigade (number 64 on the right). Willcox's Division advanced on both sides of what is today Burnside Bridge Road. Welsh's Brigade straddled the road, with most of the formation south of it (to the right).
44.277′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Rodman Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Willcox's Division, Ninth Army Corps (here, next to this marker); Longstreet's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); 45th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 100th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (about 500 feet away); 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry (about 800 feet away); The Final Attack (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Advance Was Made With the Utmost Enthusiasm (approx. 0.2 miles away); Brown’s (Wise), Virginia Battery (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, IX Corps. Col. Welsh was a business man before the war, but had served previously in the Mexican War. (Submitted on March 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Thomas Welsh. Thomas Welsh (May 5, 1824–August 14, 1863) was a soldier in the United States Army during the
Ninth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
3. Ninth Army Corps Marker
Mexican-American War and a Union brigadier general during the American Civil War. (Submitted on September 30, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Ninth Army Corps Marker (Right) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Ninth Army Corps Marker (Right)
Col. Thomas Welsh (1824-1863) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Col. Thomas Welsh (1824-1863)
On September 17, 1862, at the Battle of Antietam, after first being held in reserved (on account of its losses at South Mountain), Welsh’s brigade was placed into action in the afternoon after Burnside exhausted his other troops capturing the bridge that now bears his name. Against steady opposition, Welsh’s troops advanced a mile, entering the village of Sharpsburg (threatening to cut off the Confederate route of escape across the Potomac) before being called back because they couldn’t be supported. This was the furthest Union advance of the battle. As it was, the battle ended largely in a stalemate. Welsh's performance drew praises from his superiors, and he was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers on November 29, 1862.
The Brigade's Advance image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. The Brigade's Advance
Looking south from the tablet location at the high ground along Branch Avenue. The closest monuments in the background are for the 45th and 100th Pennsylvania of Welsh's Brigade. The regiments were arrayed from south (furthest from the camera) to north in a line as such: 8th Michigan, 100th Pennsylvania, 46th New York, and 45th Pennsylvania. The latter was situated astride the road in the ravine (under the overpass of modern Burnside Bridge Road).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 658 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on September 30, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on March 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement