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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Maumee in Lucas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site

 
 
Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
1. Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site Marker
Inscription. This park commemorates battles and treaties with the British and American Indians that led to the westward expansion of the United States and statehood for Ohio.

In the 1790s, residents of the newly formed United States were starting to move west into the Northwest Territory, a region controlled by American Indians and claimed by the British. To protect settlers, President George Washington sent General Anthony Wayne and a force of about 3,000 regulars and militia into the territory to build a series of forts between the Ohio and Maumee rivers.

Waiting for them were about 1,000 warriors. Wayne's decisive victory in the battle led to other conflicts, treaties, and eventually the War of 1812 with the British. The United States ultimately gained control of the territory.

To learn more about these historic events, visit all three of the park's sites in Maumee.

Fallen Timbers Battlefield

The Fallen Timbers Battlefield consists of 187 acres of open fields and a wooded area at the intersection of US 23 and I 475. Archeological explorations and historical research in the 1980s and 1990s revealed that this area was the actual site of the 1794 battle between U.S. troops and American Indians.

Fallen Timbers Monument

The
Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
2. Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site Marker
Close-up view of the National Historical Site related text that is seen on the extreme right side of this historical marker.
Fallen Timbers Monument is connected to the battlefield by a bike-pedestrian bridge over US 24, the Anthony Wayne Trail.
A bronze statue of General Wayne is located on a bluff overlooking the Maumee River in Side Cut Metropark. For many years the battle was thought to have occurred on the bluff and the floodplain below.

Fort Miamis

Fort Miamis is located on River Road about four miles east of the battlefield. Earthen mounds you see today were part of the fort built in 1794 by the British to stop U.S. military advances in the Maumee Valley and to solidify American Indian support against the westward spreading of U.S. settlements. The British later used the fort site in the War of 1812.
 
Erected by Metroparks of the Toledo Area.
 
Location. 41° 34.389′ N, 83° 37.616′ W. Marker is in Maumee, Ohio, in Lucas County. Marker is at the intersection of River Road and Michigan Avenue, on the left when traveling south on River Road. Touch for map. This historical marker is located where Michigan Avenue. dead ends into River Road, on the river side of River Road, in a small, Lucas County MetroPark, which is situated along the west side of the Maumee River. The historical marker is situated just to the right of
Fort Miamis National Historic Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
3. Fort Miamis National Historic Site Marker
This is a close-up view of the text found on the "Side Cut Metropark" portion of the historical marker, that features information on Fort Miamis.
where the park trail begins at the parking lot area. Marker is in this post office area: Maumee OH 43537, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Miamis (here, next to this marker); 41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812 / Private Patrick Russell (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Fort Miamis (within shouting distance of this marker); The Indian Wars (within shouting distance of this marker); British Betray Indian Allies (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Miamis During the War of 1812 (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Running a Gauntlet (about 400 feet away); A Strategic Location (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Maumee.
 
More about this marker. This historical marker is actually two displays in one, with the left 3/4s of the marker featuring the "Side Cut Metropark" and the right 1/4 of the marker featuring the "Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site." In posting this historical marker I have focused on the "National Historic Site" portion of the marker, but that isn't to say that there isn't historically useful information on the "Metropark" side of the marker.

There is a great and very useful
Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
4. Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site Marker
View of the opposite side of the historical marker, seen just to the right of the park trail, with a view of two additional historical markers in the background, and the site of Fort Miamis in the distant background.
map on the "Metropark" portion of this historical marker that enables one to not only locate the three sites discussed in the "National Historic Site" portion of the marker, but the Side Cut canal locks as well. There is also some text regarding Fort Miamis on the "Metropark" portion of the historical marker and that text states the following:

"Fort Miamis"

"The earthen mounds you see here today were part of Fort Miamis, which was built by the British in efforts to stem the westward expansion of the United States in the 1790s and early 1800s. Exhibits along the walkway interpret historic events involving the fort."

"Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site, an affiliated unit of the National Park System, is managed by Metroparks of the Toledo Area."
 
Also see . . .
1. Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site, Ohio. This is a link to information provided by the National Park Service. (Submitted on May 6, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Fallen Timbers Battlefield. This is a link to information provided by the Metroparks of the Toledo Area. (Submitted on May 6, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Battle of Fallen Timbers. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on May 6, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

4. Battle of FallenTimbers
Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
5. Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site Marker
A distant view of the historical marker, looking northwest along the park trail. The historical marker is seen just to the left of where the park trail ends (or begins) at the edge of the parking lot.
. This is a link to information provided by the Touring-Ohio website. (Submitted on May 6, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

5. Battle of Fallen Timbers Monument. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on May 6, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

6. Fort Miamis. This is a link to information provided by the Touring-Ohio website. (Submitted on May 6, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

7. Fort Miami (Ohio). This is a ink to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on May 6, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansWar of 1812Wars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 5, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 512 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 6, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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