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Caesarea, Haifa District, Israel
 

Dedicatory Inscription

כתובת הקדשה

 
 
Dedicatory Inscription Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
1. Dedicatory Inscription Marker
View of the historical marker and a replica Pilate stone to go with it.
Inscription. "(Po)ntius Pilatus, the prefect of Judaea, (erected) a (building dedicated) to (the emperor) Tiberius".

Replica. The original inscription, found in secondary use during the excavations of the theater, is on display at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

Pontius Pilatus was the Roman prefect who presided over the trial of Jesus of Nazareth (Matt. 27: 11-26). The content of the inscription and the use of the Latin language hint at the level of Romanization throughout the province, and in Caesarea, at the beginning of the 1st c. A.D.
 
Location. 32° 29.828′ N, 34° 53.386′ E. Marker is in Caesarea, Haifa District. Marker can be reached from Kvish HaTe'atron 0 kilometers west of Rothschild, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. This historical marker is located in the Caesarea Maritima National Park, very near to the western end of Kvish HaTe'atron Street. After traveling along the park walkway that leads from the Theater/ Archaeological Park area, to the Promontory Palace, you will find this historical marker situated in the area of the Upper Palace, of the Promontory Palace.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. I Appeal Unto Caesar (a few steps from this marker); The Roman Well
Dedicatory Inscription Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
2. Dedicatory Inscription Marker
Close-up view of the historical marker.
(within shouting distance of this marker); King Herod's Hippodrome (within shouting distance of this marker); The Promontory Palace (within shouting distance of this marker); The Chariot-Races (within shouting distance of this marker); Sarcophagi (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Column Capitals (about 120 meters away); The Theater (about 120 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Caesarea.
 
Regarding Dedicatory Inscription. As stated on the text of this historical marker, the stone in Caesarea Maritima is a replica, and the actual Pilate stone is on display at the Israel Museum. I have included two photographs of the actual Pilate stone and the text for the Pilate Stone display. That text states the following:

"Pontius Pilate was the fifth Roman Procurator of Judea, serving in that capacity in 26-36 CE. Sources describe him as a cruel and unsympathetic ruler who was insensitive to Jewish religious feelings. According to the New Testament, he was the one who sentenced Jesus to be crucified. The inscription presented
Dedicatory Inscription Replica image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
3. Dedicatory Inscription Replica
Close-up view of the replica Pilate Inscription Stone.
here is the only object from his time that bears his name. It was found reused in the staircase of the Roman theater of Caesarea, the provincial capital; it was probably originally set into a temple built in the honor of Emperor Tiberius."

"... building in honor of] Tiberius ... Pon]tius Pilate ... Praef]ect of Judea"

"Latin dedicatory inscription"
Caesarea, 26-36 CE, hard limestone


Because this is the only artifact found from the time of Pilate that bears his name, one website (link included) lists the discovery of this artifact as being the 6th of the "Top Ten Biblical Discoveries in Archaeology."
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Caesarea Maritima. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on April 18, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Caesarea Maritima - Cornell University. This is a link to information provided by Cornell University. (Submitted on April 18, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Top Ten Biblical Discoveries in Archaeology – #6 Pontius Pilate Inscription. This is a link to information provided by Credo
Dedicatory Inscription Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
4. Dedicatory Inscription Marker
View of the historical marker, looking west, situated in the Upper Palace of what was once called the Promontory Palace.
House Ministries. (Submitted on April 18, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

4. Pilate Stone. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on April 18, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Anthropology
 
Dedicatory Inscription Stone's "Reuse" Location image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
5. Dedicatory Inscription Stone's "Reuse" Location
View of Caesarea Maritima's ancient theater, which is where the "Dedicatory Inscription" stone was found, being "reused" in the staircase of the theater.
Dedicatory Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 14, 2013
6. Dedicatory Inscription
A view of the actual Pontius Pilate Inscription Stone, that is on permanent display at the Israel Muselum, in Jerusalem. The stone is seen just to the right side of the young girl in the photograph.
Dedicatory Inscription Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 14, 2013
7. Dedicatory Inscription Marker
A close-up view of the actual Pontius Pilate Inscription Stone, that is on permanent display at the Israel Muselum, in Jerusalem.
Dedicatory Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 14, 2013
8. Dedicatory Inscription
A view of the text that goes with the display of the actual Pontius Pilate Inscription Stone, that is on permanent display at the Israel Muselum, in Jerusalem.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 18, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 569 times since then and 37 times this year. Last updated on May 7, 2013. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 18, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   5. submitted on September 21, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   6, 7, 8. submitted on May 26, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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