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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Armistead Death Site

 
 
Armistead Death Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2013
1. Armistead Death Site Marker
Inscription.
Brig. Gen. Lewis A. Armistead, CSA,
died here on July 5, 1863 of wounds
received in Pickettís Charge on July 3.
This summer kitchen was part of the
U.S. Armyís 11th Corps Field Hospital,
located here on the George Spangler farm.

This plaque is dedicated to
the memory of Gen. Armistead

Armistead Marker
Preservation Committee
July 5, 1998

 
Erected 1998 by Armistead Marker Preservation Committee.
 
Location. 39° 48.073′ N, 77° 13.266′ W. Marker is in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker can be reached from Blacksmith Shop Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located on the George Spangler Farm. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Well, Look What We Found! (a few steps from this marker); A Temporary Resting Place (a few steps from this marker); A Family Who Would Not Leave Their Home (a few steps from this marker); Food Preservation of the Past (a few steps from this marker); A Farm Transformed by War (within
Armistead Death Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2013
2. Armistead Death Site Marker
shouting distance of this marker); The Trademark of Craftsmen (within shouting distance of this marker); A Hospital Under Fire (within shouting distance of this marker); The George Spangler Farm Civil War Hospital Site (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. George Spangler Farm. Gettysburg Foundation website. (Submitted on June 9, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Civil War Journal - The George Spangler Farm. Gettysburg Magazine. (Submitted on June 9, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Marker on the Spangler Farm image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2013
3. Marker on the Spangler Farm
Summer Kitchen on the Spangler Farm image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2013
4. Summer Kitchen on the Spangler Farm
Gen. Armistead was carried to this building after being wounded during Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863. He died here two days later.
Inside the Summer Kitchen image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2013
5. Inside the Summer Kitchen
Armistead Death Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2013
6. Armistead Death Site Marker
This statue, located in the Gettysburg National Cemetery Annex, shows a mortally wounded Gen. Armistead handing over his personal items to Union Capt. Henry Bingham, an aide to his friend Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock.
Armistead Wounding Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 7, 2007
7. Armistead Wounding Marker
This memorial marks the location on the battlefield where Gen. Armistead received his mortal wound.
Grave of Gen. Armistead in Baltimore image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 19, 2003
8. Grave of Gen. Armistead in Baltimore
Gen. Armistead was originally buried at the George Spangler Farm. He was later moved to the Old Saint Paulís Cemetery in Baltimore and reinterred next to his uncle Colonel George Armistead, Commander of Fort McHenry during the British bombardment Sept. 13-14, 1814.
Second Armistead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 17, 2014
9. Second Armistead Marker
The Death of a General
In the aftermath of Pickettís Charge on July 3, a number of Confederate wounded were transported to the Spangler farm for medical treatment. Among them was Confederate Brig. Gen. Lewis Armistead, one of three brigade commanders in Pickettís Division. It was General Armistead who had led the breakthrough of the Union position on Cemetery Ridge with some 150 Confederate soldiers. The breakthrough was short lived and Armistead was shot down, wounded in the arm and leg. When he reached the farm he was placed in a “kitchen,” which could have been this summer kitchen. The historical record is unclear. Neither of his wounds were considered mortal by the surgeons that attended him, yet two days later General Armistead was dead. Armistead was initially buried on the farm, where “he was wrapped in a blanket and buried back of the barn that was filled with wounded men.” His body was later reinterred at Old Saint Paulís Cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland.
Armistead Marker in the Summer Kitchen image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 17, 2014
10. Armistead Marker in the Summer Kitchen
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 7, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 730 times since then and 74 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on June 7, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   8. submitted on June 9, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   9, 10. submitted on November 15, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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