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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lowell in Essex County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Debating Slavery

 
 
Debating Slavery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, May 25, 2013
1. Debating Slavery Marker
Inscription. By the late 1840ís, slavery was a defining political issue in northern cities. The topic was hotly debated in Lowell and created unlikely political alliances.

Abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison visited Lowell as early as the 1830ís and labor reformers drew uncomfortable parallels between working conditions in the mills and slavery in the South.

Many labor reformers, however, strongly opposed the abolitionists. Yet several of Lowellís most prominent investors, such as Amos Lawrence, supported the abolition of slavery but opposed labor reform.

Frederick Douglas (above) the former slave and abolitionist, lectured, wrote, and campaigned tirelessly for the abolition of slavery. He appeared in Lowell many times. On one visit, he introduced city residents to escaped slave George Latimer who spoke about the evils of southern bondage.

(Inscription regarding the photo on the far right)
George Thompson (right of center) added an international twist to the American abolitionist movement. As a member of Parliament, he had been successful in ending slavery in the British West Indies. Wendell Phillips (left) and William Lloyd Garrison (center) drew upon Thompsonís success by inviting him to Lowell, in 1834, to further promote and broaden the abolitionist movement.
 
Erected by
Debating Slavery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, May 25, 2013
2. Debating Slavery Marker
Lowell National Historic Park.
 
Location. 42° 38.767′ N, 71° 18.717′ W. Marker is in Lowell, Massachusetts, in Essex County. Marker is on Merrimack Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lawrence MA 01842, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Irish Labor (here, next to this marker); Steam Railroads In New England (within shouting distance of this marker); St. Anne's Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Merrimack St. Depot (within shouting distance of this marker); Street of Lighting (within shouting distance of this marker); Life on the Corporation (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Worker (about 500 feet away); Homage to Women (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lowell.
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRIndustry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 16, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 383 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 16, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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