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Monterey in Monterey County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Hippolyte Bouchard Monument

When the Argentine Flag Flew Over Monterey

 

—Cuando la bandera argentina voló sobre Monterey —

 
Hippolyte Bouchard Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alvis Hendley, May 21, 2018
1. Hippolyte Bouchard Monument Marker
New version of the interpretive placard.
Inscription.
(Editor's note: The original marker has been replaced.)

New Marker:
(English Text:)
Hippolyte Bouchard is celebrated in Argentina as a hero and patriot and founder of the Argentine Navy--the equivalent of John Paul Jones in American history. Argentina placed this monument in celebration of his 200th birthday.

Hippolyte Bouchard, a Navy commander in the service of Argentina, was born near St. Tropez, France in 1780. After serving in Napoleon's navy in the war against England, he joined the revolution against Spain in South America. By 1811 he was fighting for the independence of Argentina, Peru and Chile. In 1870 Bouchard launched a daring naval campaign to attack Spanish provinces on a voyage to circumnavigate the world. He blockaded the port of Manila, Philippines, and struck other Spanish ports. After stopping in Hawaii to purchase supplies and hire 80 men, Bouchard set sail with two ships and 360 men for California under the flag of liberated Argentina. ON November 20, 1818, he sailed into Monterey, capital of Spanish Alta California. After firing upon the fort, El Castillo, he demanded the surrender of Monterey to the revolutionary forces. Governor Sola refused and sent the residents to safety inland.
Hippolyte Bouchard Monument and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alvis Hendley, May 21, 2018
2. Hippolyte Bouchard Monument and Marker
Bouchard's men pulled down the Spanish flag, raised the Argentine flag which flew over Monterey for six days, and ransacked Monterey. After burning the governor's house and storerooms, Bouchard's forces sailed from Monterey to raid Southern California.

(Spanish Text:)
Hipólito Bouchard se celebra en Argentina como un héroe y patriota y fundador de la Armada Argentina, el equivalente de John Paul Jones en la historia de Estados Unidos. Argentina colocó este monumento en celebración de su 200 ° cumpleaños.


Hipólito Bouchard, un comandante de la Marina al servicio de Argentina, nació cerca de St. Tropez, Francia en 1780. Después de servir en la armada de Napoleón en la guerra contra Inglaterra, se unió a la revolución contra España en América del Sur. En 1811 luchaba por la independencia de Argentina, Perú y Chile. En 1870 Bouchard lanzó una atrevida campaña naval para atacar las provincias españolas en un viaje para circunnavegar el mundo. Bloqueó el puerto de Manila, Filipinas, y atacó otros puertos españoles. Después de detenerse en Hawái para comprar suministros y contratar a 80 hombres, Bouchard zarpó con dos barcos y 360 hombres para California bajo la bandera de la Argentina liberada. El 20 de noviembre de 1818, zarpó hacia Monterey, capital de la Alta California
The Original Bouchard Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 29, 2013
3. The Original Bouchard Monument Marker
española. Después de disparar contra el fuerte, El Castillo, exigió la rendición de Monterey a las fuerzas revolucionarias. El gobernador Sola se negó y envió a los residentes a la seguridad tierra adentro. Los hombres de Bouchard bajaron la bandera española, levantaron la bandera argentina que sobrevoló Monterrey durante seis días y saquearon Monterey. Después de quemar la casa y los almacenes del gobernador, las fuerzas de Bouchard zarparon de Monterey para atacar el sur de California.

Original Marker:
On November 20, 1818, in the closing years of the Spanish Era, Capitan Hippolyte Bouchard entered Monterey Bay with two ships, flying the flag of the United Provinces of the Rio de la Plata, Argentina. The next day, one ship attacked the Spanish fort from the bay and the other sailed toward Pacific Grove where it anchored and dispatched a land force to take the fort from the rear. The Spanish fled, and Monterey lay under the Argentine flag while the privateers reprovisioned their ships and burned down the town. Bouchard sailed away on December 1, and Monterey reverted to Spanish rule for another four years until Mexico took control of the area. (Marker Number 6.)
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 36° 36.359′ 
La Armada Argentina image. Click for full size.
By Alvis Hendley, May 21, 2018
4. La Armada Argentina
Click on photo to read text.
N, 121° 53.741′ W. Marker was in Monterey, California, in Monterey County. Marker could be reached from Corporal Ewing Road. Touch for map. This marker is located to the east of Corporal Ewing Road on the grounds of the Monterey Presidio. Marker was in this post office area: Monterey CA 93944, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. The Argentine Navy (here, next to this marker); El Castillo de Monterey (a few steps from this marker); El Castillo Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Here ... landed Very Rev. Father Junipero Serra (within shouting distance of this marker); Presidio of Monterey Museum (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Don Caspar de Portolá (about 600 feet away); 400th Anniversary of the Naming of Monterey Bay by Gen. Sebastián Vizcaíno (about 600 feet away); Sloat Monument (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Monterey.
 
Also see . . .  Hippolyte de Bouchard - Wikipedia. His forces occupied Monterey, California, then a Spanish colony, raising the Argentine flag there and briefly claiming a small portion of the future U.S. State of California for Argentina. After raiding Monterey, he plundered Mission San Juan Capistrano in Southern California. (Submitted on February 7, 2013, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.)
The Monument and Original Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 29, 2013
5. The Monument and Original Marker
 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNotable Events
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 30, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 7, 2013, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 415 times since then and 52 times this year. Last updated on July 8, 2013, by James King of San Miguel, California. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 30, 2018, by Alvis Hendley of San Francisco, California.   3. submitted on February 7, 2013, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   4. submitted on May 30, 2018, by Alvis Hendley of San Francisco, California.   5. submitted on February 7, 2013, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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