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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
near Snow Hill in Greene County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

James Glasgow

ca. 1735-1819

 
 
James Glasgow Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2013
1. James Glasgow Marker
Inscription.
The first Secretary of
State of N.C., 1777-98.
Glasgow (now Greene)
County was named for
him. Convicted of land
fraud. Lived 2 mi. N.E.

 
Erected 2003 by North Carolina Office of Archives and History. (Marker Number F-66.)
 
Location. 35° 30.123′ N, 77° 44.361′ W. Marker is in near Snow Hill, North Carolina, in Greene County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 58 and Sheppards Ferry Road (State Highway 1222), on the right when traveling north on State Highway 58. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Snow Hill NC 28580, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Nooherooka (approx. 1.9 miles away); Hull Road (approx. 5.8 miles away); Grimsley Baptist Church (approx. 5.8 miles away); Peacock's Bridge (approx. 7.1 miles away); Nuclear Mishap (approx. 8.2 miles away); Hookerton Defenses (approx. 10 miles away); Chasing Gen. Potter (approx. 10.7 miles away); Wheat Swamp Church (approx. 11.8 miles away).
 
Regarding James Glasgow.  The naming of a county can provide a lesson in North Carolina history. What is now Greene County was
James Glasgow Marker along NC Highway 58 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2013
2. James Glasgow Marker along NC Highway 58
once part of Johnston but in 1758 it became Dobbs County for royal governor Arthur Dobbs. In 1791 that name was “expunged from our map,” as historian Kemp Battle phrased it, and a new county was named for the Secretary of State, James Glasgow. When Glasgow met an ignominious end, in 1799 the name was changed to Greene to honor Nathanael Greene, the hero of Guilford Courthouse.

   James Glasgow (ca. 1735-1819), born in Maryland, in 1765 acquired a plantation on Contentnea Creek known as “Fairfield” as a gift from his father-in-law. Glasgow, active in the colonial militia, took part in the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge but soon forsook the military for politics. As assistant secretary of the Provincial Congresses, 1775-1776, and clerk of the Council of State, 1776-1779, Glasgow earned the respect of the state’s Revolutionary patriots. His reward was election by the legislature in 1777 as North Carolina’s first Secretary of State. A principal duty of that position was the oversight of the military land grant program, the issuance of property in what became Tennessee to veterans of the Revolution.

   In 1797, on receipt of a letter from Andrew Jackson setting forth charges of impropriety in the issuance of the grants, Gov. Samuel Ashe and the legislature set in motion events leading to Glasgow’s resignation and eventual conviction on land
James Glasgow Marker at the intersection of State Highway 58 and Sheppards Ferry Road image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2013
3. James Glasgow Marker at the intersection of State Highway 58 and Sheppards Ferry Road


fraud charges. Notwithstanding the fact that others were involved in the scandal, Glasgow suffered the consequences. The committee of inquiry determined that the Secretary of State should be charged with a misdemeanor, dereliction of duty as a public officer. A tribunal found him guilty on two counts and fined him 1,000 pounds on each. Glasgow left the state and settled near Nashville, Tennessee, where he died in 1819. “Behold the reward of dishonesty and official corruption!” wrote Kemp Battle in 1903.
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 12, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 358 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 12, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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