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New Ulm in Brown County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument

 
 
German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
1. German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Marker
Inscription. This monument was erected in 1991 by the German-Bohemian Heritage Society to commemorate the immigrants to this region from the German speaking western rim of present-day Czechoslovakia. They emigrated from the counties of Bischofteinitz, Mies and Taus in the province of Pilsen, as shown on the European map and settled in the townships sketched on the U.S. map. Around the base in the granite slabs are inscribed the over 350 immigrant family names as they were approximately spelled when the families departed their old homeland. Known at the time of their departure as Bohemia, a crown colony in the Austro-Hungarian empire, this region in the 20th century was included in the larger periphery of the Czech nation designated as the Sudetenland, more locally it was called the Bohmerwald Bohemian Forest, a ridge of high hills that forms a natural border with Germany.

The immigrants came mostly from small villages with the largest numbers from the village centers of Hostau, Muttersdorf and Ronsberg. These were farm communities where the people lived and housed their stock, going out daily to work their scattered non-contiguous fields. Most villages had Catholic churches or chapels and the residents spoke a Bohemian dialect of German. From New Years day to Christmas each year they observed special traditions spiced with large wedding
German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
2. German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Marker
celebrations and funerals attended by the entire communities. Music in every form--bands, singing societies, and choirs--permeated all the aspects of village life.

Many German-Bohemian traditions crossed the ocean to the New Ulm region. Some immigrants from Bohemia were among the earliest farm settlers arriving by ship on the Minnesota River within two years after German Turners founded the city. Beginning in 1856 they farmed in Cottonwood Township, then extended their settlement northward into St. George and westward into Sigel Township, Sleepy Eye and farther west. As more and more arrived (after 1872 by rail) they could no longer all farm. Beginning around 1880 they acquired homes especially in the southeast section of the city of New Ulm, an area they affectionately called the Ganseviertel, Goosetown. They also concentrated in the Wallachei (Low Land) region to the west. Farther north in the city, retired farmers built homes near Trinity Catholic Church. Younger city dwellers often labored in the roller mills, the breweries and as carpenters, masons and cigar makers. Among them in later years were also doctors, painters, musicians, butchers and blacksmiths. Many women eared extra money Klopping (making lace) and sewing feather-filled bedding. The Bohemian Heritage has been most strongly exhibited in the "Old Time" band traditions of Southern Minnesota.
 
Erected
German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Maps image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
3. German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Maps
Die alte Heimat Old Homeland Vicinity The New Homeland
1991 by the German-Bohemian Heritage Society.
 
Location. 44° 18.963′ N, 94° 27.562′ W. Marker is in New Ulm, Minnesota, in Brown County. Marker is at the intersection of North German Street and North 2nd Street, on the right when traveling north on North German Street. Touch for map. Marker is at German Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 North German Street, New Ulm MN 56073, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. U.S. - Dakota War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Pioneer Founders of New Ulm (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Barricading New Ulm (about 400 feet away); Grand Hotel (about 500 feet away); Kiesling House (about 500 feet away); Crone Store (about 500 feet away); Erd Building (about 500 feet away); Dacotah House (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Ulm.
 
More about this marker. The monument was created by Leopold Hafner; the granite pedestal was created by Bloedel Monument Co.
 
Also see . . .
1. German-Bohemian Monument. German-Bohemian Heritage Society. A list of the three hundred and fifty-five German-Bohemian family names that are inscribed in the granite tablets that
German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
4. German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument
surround the German-Bohemian Immigrant Monument. (Submitted on July 26, 2013.) 

2. German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument. "Bronze statue of a man, woman and child. On the back, the parents legs are raised to represent their love of music and dancing, valued traditions brought from the old country." (Submitted on July 26, 2013.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
5. German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument
Close-up of Sculpture image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, July 30, 2013
6. Close-up of Sculpture
German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Base image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
7. German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Base
Dedicated July 20, 1991
German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Base image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, July 30, 2013
8. German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Base
This monument was created by Leopold Hafner, a refugee from Bohemia in 1946, now of Aicha vorm Wald near Passau, Germany
German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Base image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, July 30, 2013
9. German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument Base
This granite pedestal was crafted by Bloedel Monument Co., New Ulm
Family Names on Granite Tablets image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, July 30, 2013
10. Family Names on Granite Tablets
Altmann Ambrose Anton Arbes Augustin Barr Baier Barth Bartl Bashal Bauer Baumann Baumeister Baumel Beck Beranek Berdan Berle Beyer Biebel Bier Borth Braulick Braun Braunreiter Brei Breu Brey Brix Bruckbauer Brunner Buchl Buringer Bushard Dauben Dauer Debart Diedrick Dietl Dietrich Dietz Dittrich Domeier Dreschler Drexler Ebenhoh Eberl Ebert Eckert Eckstein Eisen Faas Fast Felber Fink Fischer Fleck Fleissner Floetl Flor Forst Forster Forstner Fortwengler Frandon Frank Franta Frodel Fuchs Gabriel Gag Giebisch Gitter Gleisner Goblirsch Grau Grausam Greim Griebel Groebner Grossmann Gruber Gruener Grunert Guendner Guetter Guldan Gulden Guttum Haala
Family Names on Granite Tablets image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, July 30, 2013
11. Family Names on Granite Tablets
Haas Hacker Haeberle Hammerschmidt Harricot Hartmann Hauser Heger Hegler Heinl Held Helgert Helget Heller Herbeck Herlick Herrian Hilsmasik Hoecherl Hoffman Hoffmann Hofmeister Hogen Holl Holm Hornick Hostelka Janni Jungbauer Kachelmeier Kagermeier Kahs Kalb Kalz Kamm Karl Kass Kastner Keck Keckhesen Keckstein Keim Kestner Kiefner Kitzberger Kelment Kloeckl Knoedl Kober Koenig Koester Kohout Kokesch Kolb Kopp Koreis Kosek Kowasch Kral Kraus Krausen Kretsch Krippner Kroy Krzmarzick Kubitzka Kuehn Kunz Kusch Landsteiner Lanendorfer Lang Landkammer Leiminger Leitschuh Lesser Lieb Liebl Liedel Lilla Lindemann Lindmeier Lindmeyer Lippert Lockway Loesch Losleben Losser Lucas Macho Mack
Family Names on Granite Tablets image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, July 30, 2013
12. Family Names on Granite Tablets
Mages Mahall Maidl Maingler Marka Marschalek Martinka Marz Mathiowetz Matsch Mattes Mauch Mayer Meidl Meyer Miller Moldan Moldaschei Mueller Namer Neid Neidecker Neubauer Neudecker Neumann Neuwirth Novak Ott Paa Pankratz Pany Pascher Pechtel Pelzel Plezl Penkert Peterl Peuzer Pillmeyer Pleniger Polta Portner Preckner Pregler Prokosch Prosek Raschka Reiber Reichert Reiger Reim Reinarts Reiniger Reitter Remiger Renner Rewitzer Reznich Richter Riebl Ries Rohner Roiger Roith Roschko Rothmeier Rothmeyer Rubey Rubie Sackl Saffert Saickl Sampel Sandhoefner Schaeffer Schaller Schatscko Schenk Schieffert Schiller Schleicher Schloegel Schluck Schmaltz Schmaus Schmidt Schneider Schnobrich Schottenbauer Schmid Schmidt Schneider Schnobrich Schottenbauer
Family Names on Granite Tablets image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, July 30, 2013
13. Family Names on Granite Tablets
Schroeder Schroepfer Schubert Schueler Schuemann Schumacker Schwab Schwinghammer Seidl Seifert Seitz Sellner Selmer Serbus Siebenbrenner Simmet Simon Singer Sittauer Smasal Sorer Soukup Sperl Sprenger Stadick Stadtherr Steffel Steffl Steinbach Steiner Stelzer Stelzner Stoderl Stoehr Stoerl Stolte Stoltz Straka Strohmer Stueber Sturm Suess Tauber Tauer Teynor Tietel Traurig Traxler Ubl Vogel Wagner Waiebel Wallenta Walter Warta Wartha Weber Wech Weltsch Wendinger Wenninger Wiedl Weier Wiesner Wild Wilfahrt Willinger Wilt Wiltcheck Windschitl Witt Wolf Woratschka Wurmstein Wurtzberer Zander Zangel Zeig Zeug Ziegler Zischka Zupfer Zwach Bregel Grosam Herschman Kopetzki Schroedl Zwaschka Lampl Schweinfurter
Nearby Plaque image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
14. Nearby Plaque
Paul R. Kretsch
March 25, 1938
August 23, 2006
"I grew up in an environment which included the German-Bohemian culture. Already as a young man I recognized the uniqueness about this culture. Belonging to this organization has taught me just how unique and special it is. This makes my job not one of labor, but rather one of love."
Paul Kretsch, President of the German-Bohemian Heritage Society from 1989 to 2004, played a significant role in the planning, fund raising, and construction of the German-Bohemian Immigrant Monument. He worked tirelessly to communicate and foster an understanding and deep appreciation of the German-Bohemian people, their rich cultural heritage, unique language and beautiful music.
We are grateful for his many years of leadership and service to the GBHS and the City of New Ulm. Paul will not be forgotten.
Dedicated August 18, 2007
Nearby Plaque image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
15. Nearby Plaque
Rudolph Kiefner
Mar. 5, 1934 Bischofteinitz, Bohemia
Feb. 2, 1993 Kassel, Germany
Rudolf Kiefner's leadership, determination, and untiring zeal were a great inspiration to the planning and construction of the German-Bohemian Immigrant Monument. He formed a bond between people of this area and many in Europe. He hoped the monument would serve as a remembrance for future generations, and bind together forever the people whose ancestors shared the same homeland. This community has lost a good friend. May he always be remembered.
View from Monument image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
16. View from Monument
Angel of the Waters Fountain in German Park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 26, 2013, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 907 times since then and 219 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 26, 2013, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.   6. submitted on March 16, 2014, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.   7. submitted on July 26, 2013, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.   8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on March 16, 2014, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.   14, 15, 16. submitted on July 26, 2013, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.
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