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Richmond in Madison County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Kit Carson-Legend of the Old West

 
 
Kit Carson-Legend of the Old West Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 21, 2013
1. Kit Carson-Legend of the Old West Marker
Inscription.

Christopher Houston “Kit” Carson

Famous old west Figure

Was born in Madison County on December 24, 1809

Less than two years later, the Carson family moved to Missouri. After his father, Lindsey Carson, was killed in an accident, eight-year old Kit left school to help support his family. When he was 16, Carson joined a wagon train headed for Santa Fe. For the next ten years, Kit trapped and hunted in the Rocky Mountains, often living among Native Americans.

Carson was known for his courage, honesty, devotion to duty, and loyalty. He was also lucky, often finding himself in the right place at the right time. Such was the case in 1842 when he met John C. Fremont, and army engineer mapping the western states. Fremont hired Carson as a guide. Together they blazed trails across the American West. Fremontís colorful reports of Carsonís skills and daring published in eastern newspapers made Kit Carson famous. Stories of his exploits soon appeared in popular “Dime Novels” and the legend of Kit Carson grew.

Carson and Fremont participated in the Bear Flag rebellion, which took California from Mexico in 1846. During the Mexican War, Carson led forces from New Mexico back to California to fight off an invading Mexican army. After the war,
Kit Carson-Legend of the Old West Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 21, 2013
2. Kit Carson-Legend of the Old West Marker
he served as Indian agent of the Southwest territories. During the Civil War, Carson joined the Union army. He helped raise a regiment of New Mexico troops and fought in the Battle of Valverde in New Mexico.

Failing health forced Kit Carson to resign his army commitment in 1867. He settled in Colorado. The next year, his wife of 25 years, Josefa, died. Kit Carson died one month later, on May 23, 1868. The following year, the coupleís remains were moved to a cemetery in Taos, New Mexico.

Kit Carson Facts

He worked as a hunter for the U.S. Army.
Carson City, Nevada is named for him.
He helped John C. Fremont map California and Oregon.
Kit Carson Drive in Richmond, Kentucky is named for him.
He once drove 6,500 sheep from New Mexico to California.
Californiaís Carson River is named for him.
He was awarded the rank of brigadier general for gallantry in the battle of Valverde.
 
Location. 37° 45.3′ N, 84° 18.783′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Kentucky, in Madison County. Marker is on Tates Creek Avenue (on School Road) north of Westover Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. This marker is on the grounds of Kit Carson Elementary School. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond KY 40475, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other
Kit Carson-Legend of the Old West Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 21, 2013
3. Kit Carson-Legend of the Old West Marker
markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Christopher (Kit) Carson (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gov. James B. McCleary (approx. 0.8 miles away); Frances E. Beauchamp / Prohibition Advocate (approx. one mile away); James B. McCreary Hall of Justice (approx. one mile away); County Named, 1786 / County Formed (approx. 1.1 miles away); Samuel Freeman Miller (approx. 1.1 miles away); Madison County Courthouse 1862 (approx. 1.1 miles away); Pioneer Monument (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 17, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 317 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 17, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Al Wolf was the editor who published this page.
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