Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Woodley Park in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Redwood

 
 
Redwood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
1. Redwood Marker
Inscription. The Woodley Park neighborhood that is now home to several thousand residents as well as the National Zoo was once sparsely settled countryside. The farmhouse shown here, known as Redwood, was built around 1819 on a hill that rose 40 feet above current street level. During the Buchanan administration (1857-61), the estate became a fashionable resort. Later, 80 of the 125 acres became part of the National Zoological Park.

In 1856 Jefferson Davis, then secretary of war, summer here with his family. Davis rented the home from Captain Edmund French, a classmate from West Point. Mrs. Davis wrote "we took a house two or three miles out of town and spent the heated term there," visited frequently by President and Mrs. Pierce.

During the Civil War, Union Soldiers convalescing in hospitals thought Jefferson Davis owned the property, so they continually raided the farm. They were so destructive that Captain French's widow and children, who still lived there, were forced to move to town.

In 1920 the house was razed, and 125,000 tons of dirt and rock were removed to lower the plot to the level of Connecticut Avenue. Harry Wardman used eight acres to build Cathedral Mansions here, a complex of three buildings containing 500 apartments - a the time said to be the largest apartment complex south of New York.

The
Redwood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
2. Redwood Marker
Woodley Park call boxes were developed by the Woodley Park Community Association as part of Art on Call, a program of Cultural Tourism DC with support from the DC commission on the Arts and Humanities, the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development, and the District Department of Transportation. Local support for this call box was provided by the Woodley Park Community Association and Yasmin David Family.
Visit www.woodleypark.org for a map and more information

 
Erected by Art on Call.
 
Location. 38° 55.783′ N, 77° 3.317′ W. Marker is in Woodley Park, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Connecticut Avenue Northwest 0.1 miles south of Devonshire Place Northwest, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in an old police call-box in front of Cathedral Mansions Apartments west of the National Zoo. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3000 Connecticut Avenue, Washington DC 20008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Black and Gray Squirrels (within shouting distance of this marker); Long & Winding Woodley Road (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); From Woodley to Woodley Park
Redwood <br>also known as Oak Hill image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
3. Redwood
also known as Oak Hill
Close-up of photo on marker
Library of Congress
(about 700 feet away); Mihran Mesrobian (about 800 feet away); Woodley Road Neighbors (approx. 0.2 miles away); Walsh Memorial (approx. mile away); Harry Wardman (approx. mile away); Woodley Estate (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Woodley Park.
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesWar, US Civil
 
Cathedral Mansions<br>North Building image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
4. Cathedral Mansions
North Building
Cathedral Mansions<br>North Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
5. Cathedral Mansions
North Entrance
Cathedral Mansions<br>South Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
6. Cathedral Mansions
South Entrance
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 18, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 345 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 18, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement