Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tulsa in Tulsa County, Oklahoma — The American South (West South Central)
 

Not Just a Ball Game

Pokkecetv Atekose Tokot Omes

 

—Sculpted by Sandra Van Zandt —

 
Not Just a Ball Game Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
1. Not Just a Ball Game Marker
Inscription.

Pokkecetv mahoke tomes momes tomisen matekoset tokot omes. Nake acaket ontomen safvcket omhoyatet tomes. Epofvnkv emaye sarakecat omhoyates. Pokkape waret huerihocvt acayecet omhoyate tomes. Honvntaket momen hoktaket etemafvckake tomes. Pokkon temasaket onomat honvntaket tokonhe atekosen seyanicen, hoktaket enke atekosen seyanicvke tomes. Ahonkatkvt ekvn nafkak nomat solket omen elecvt nacomoset omes.

There are two forms of Stickball games; in earlier times only the men with the greatest athletic ability played the game. The game depicted by these sculptures is the social game played today by adults and children known as the Single Pole game. There can be as many as 30 tribal members playing the game at one time. To begin the game, a small ball made of animal hide is tossed into the air. The male players use a pair of sticks with a leather web and the female players use their bare hands to catch and throw the ball. To receive the maximum 7 points a player must hit the object, a cow skull or fish, which is placed on the top of the pole approximately 25 feet in the air. The player who hits the lower designated area of the pole is given the minimum 2 points. There are designated scorekeepers to determine the winner. On some ceremonial grounds the pole itself has a religious representation, similar to a prayer pole. The
Not Just a Ball Game Sponsor Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
2. Not Just a Ball Game Sponsor Marker
pole is cut and erected in a sacred ceremony. The game is usually played in the fall during the winter dance when the weather is cool. Today, Stickball is still an important activity at the ceremonial Stomp Grounds. It is also a recreational sport played by the community and intertribal teams.

Dedicated December 19, 2008, in grateful appreciation of our Centennial sponsors and the Oklahoma Centennial Commission.
 
Erected 2008 by Concerned Citizens, Foundations, and Organizations.
 
Location. 36° 8.143′ N, 95° 59.388′ W. Marker is in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in Tulsa County. Marker is at the intersection of 18th Street and Cheyenne Avenue, on the left when traveling west on 18th Street. Touch for map. Marker and sculpture are in Stickball Park. Marker is in this post office area: Tulsa OK 74119, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Creek Stickball Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Mary Veasey Leech (within shouting distance of this marker); Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Elliott Building (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Bridge that Saved Tulsa
Not Just a Ball Game Sculpture image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
3. Not Just a Ball Game Sculpture
(approx. 0.9 miles away); First Presbyterian Church Centennial (approx. one mile away); Oklahoma Natural Gas Company Building (approx. one mile away); Pentane (C5H12) Molecular Model (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tulsa.
 
Also see . . .
1. Variations of Stickball. (Submitted on August 24, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Ceremonial Stomp Grounds at Facebook. (Submitted on August 24, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. RSU Stickball Workshop 2009. (Submitted on August 24, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. How to Make a Creek Stickball Ball. (Submitted on August 24, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
5. Muscogee (Creek) Nation. (Submitted on August 24, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. EntertainmentMan-Made FeaturesNative AmericansSports
 
Not Just a Ball Game Sculpture Detail image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
4. Not Just a Ball Game Sculpture Detail
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 24, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 376 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 24, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
Paid Advertisement