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Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria
 

The Golden Roof and New Courtyard

Goldenes Dachl und neuer Hof

 
 
Golden Roof / and new courtyard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 14, 2013
1. Golden Roof / and new courtyard Marker
Inscription. In diesem Gebäude befand sich von 1420 bis ca. 1460 die Residenz der Tiroler Landesfürsten Friedrich IV. und Sigmund des Münzreichen.

Der mit 2657 feuervergoldeten Kupferschindeln gedeckte Prunkerker, das Wahrzeichen der Stadt, wurde als Auftragswerk unter Kaiser Maximilian I. von Niclas Türing d.Ä. errichtet und laut Inschrift im Jahre 1500 fertiggestellt. Die Fresken stammen von Maximilians Hofmaler Jörg Kölderer.

Die Erkerreliefs zeigen Porträts Maximilians und seiner beiden Gemahlinnen, die von Moriskentänzern umgeben werden. Wappen, verdeckte Hinweise und Symbole ergeben ein komplexes Gesamtkunstwerk, das das Selbstverständnis Mazimilians widerspiegelt. Das Schriftband hinter den Tänzern auf den Reliefs konnte nicht entziffert werden.

German-English translation:

From 1420 to 1460 this building was the residence of the Tirolean sovereigns, Frederick IV and Sigmund the Wealthy.

The roof of the magnificent oriel, covered with 2,657 fire-gilded copper tiles, serves as a symbol of the city. Nicholas Türing the Elder was commissioned by Emperor Maximilian I to construct and complete the building in 1500, according to the inscription. The frescoes are by the Emperor Maximilian's court painter, Jörg Kölderer.

The bay reliefs show portraits of Maximilian and his two consorts,
Golden Roof / and new courtyard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 14, 2013
2. Golden Roof / and new courtyard Marker
who are surrounded by Moorish dancers. The crest, along with hidden clues and symbols together result in a complex work of art that reflects Maximilian's self-understanding. The band with writing, behind the dancers on the reliefs, could not be deciphered.
 
Erected by Stadt Innsbruck (City of Innsbruck).
 
Location. 47° 16.115′ N, 11° 23.594′ E. Marker is in Innsbruck, Tyrol. Marker is at the intersection of Herzog-Friedrich-Straße and Herzog-Friedrich-Straße, on the right when traveling west on Herzog-Friedrich-Straße. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Herzog-Friedrich-Straße 15, Innsbruck, Tyrol 6020, Austria.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hölblinghaus (here, next to this marker); Jakob Hutter (here, next to this marker); Bederlunger House (a few steps from this marker); The Old City Hall / City Tower (within shouting distance of this marker); Precht House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Teutonic Order House (within shouting distance of this marker); Katzunghaus (within shouting distance of this marker); To Mantua in Chains (The Song of Andreas Hofer) (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Innsbruck.
 
Also see . . .
The Golden Roof image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 14, 2013
3. The Golden Roof

1. Golden Roof - Wikipedia. The Golden Roof was built by Archduke Friedrich IV in the early 15th century as the residence of the Tirolean sovereigns. The Golden Roof actually is the three-story balcony on the central plaza at the heart of the Old Town. (Submitted on August 26, 2013, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. A Little Known Story About Innsbruck’s Goldenes Dachl (Golden Roof). Letsgoexploring.com tells the story of how the Golden Roof was shielded from damage during the Second World War: During World War II Innsbruck suffered from both occupation by Axis powers and aerial bombing from the Allies. In the mid and late war years the city was slammed on multiple occasions from Allied bombs which devastated the nearby railroad yards and many surrounding buildings. The Altstadt area also received bomb damage. To protect this treasure, the people of Innsbruck encased the Goldenes Dachl in a thick bunker to protect it from damage. At the War’s end the bunker was removed; amidst the surrounding ruins of war the preserved Goldenes Dachl shown brightly and became a symbol of hope during Innsbruck’s rebuilding.... (Submitted on September 23, 2013.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
The Golden Roof image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 14, 2013
4. The Golden Roof
The royal box of Mazimilian I. image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 14, 2013
5. The royal box of Mazimilian I.
The Golden Roof image. Click for full size.
By Detroit Publishing Company, circa 1900
6. The Golden Roof
The Golden Roof and City Tower - Looking North on Herzog Friederichstrasse image. Click for full size.
By P. Ledermann, Wien, 1910
7. The Golden Roof and City Tower - Looking North on Herzog Friederichstrasse
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 26, 2013, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 455 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 26, 2013, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   6, 7. submitted on September 23, 2013. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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