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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cashtown in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Roads West

 
 
Roads West Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
1. Roads West Marker
Inscription. The historic Cashtown Inn has been offering lodging and dining to weary travelers since the turn of the 19th Century.

Roads were important to town development, just as the automobile was important to their prosperity. As roads brought travelers into the countryside, they needed places to stay and eat. Inns attracted businesses that served the traveling public, which, in turn, spurred the development of towns. After the birth of the automobile, more people than ever traveled for recreation.

In 1812, the construction of a turnpike's northwest extension spurred Peter Marks to build his brick tavern here. By 1821 Cashtown had been established, which allegedly received its name because Marks insisted on cash payments.

During the Civil War, Confederates passed by the Inn twice - in mid-October 1862 and during the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. On July 5 a Confederate wagon train carrying the wounded men left Cashtown; the train was about 17 miles in length.
 
Erected by Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lincoln Highway marker series.
 
Location. 39° 53.076′ N, 77° 21.599′ W. Marker is in Cashtown, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker
Roads West Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
2. Roads West Marker
is on Main Street (U.S. 30) 0.2 miles west of High Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in the Cashtown Inn parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Cashtown PA 17310, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Imboden's Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Cashtown Inn (within shouting distance of this marker); Gettysburg Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of School House and Burial Ground (approx. 1.2 miles away); Robertson's Brigade (approx. 2.7 miles away); Manor of Maske (approx. 2.8 miles away); Hugh Culbertson Farm (approx. 3.5 miles away); Mary Jemison (approx. 3.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cashtown.
 
More about this marker. In the upper left is a 1895 photograph capturing the Old Hotel. During the early 20th century, it was a well known roadhouse, dance hall and restaurant, featuring chicken and waffles - the favorite meal of Lincoln Highway travelers. Cashtown Inn has been featured in the film Gettysburg and several books and videos. On the upper right is a Turn of the century postcard depicting Cashtown's Main Street.
 
Regarding Roads West. Noticed marker had been replaced during a September 2012 visit.
 
Also see . . .
Roads West Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
3. Roads West Marker

1. History of Cashtown Inn. The Inn still serves hungry travelers and offers rooms named for Confederate generals. (Submitted on September 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. The Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor. (Submitted on June 3, 2009, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.)
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesWar, US Civil
 
Roads West Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 20, 2017
4. Roads West Marker
The Cashtown Inn can be seen in the background.
Cashtown Inn Parking Lot image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
5. Cashtown Inn Parking Lot
The marker stands in the row divider.
The Cashtown Inn image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
6. The Cashtown Inn
The remains of the "Roads West" marker. image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, April 12, 2011
7. The remains of the "Roads West" marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 22, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,804 times since then and 49 times this year. Last updated on September 10, 2013, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 28, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   4. submitted on April 21, 2017, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5, 6. submitted on September 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7. submitted on June 23, 2011, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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