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Root in Montgomery County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Enoch Ambler

 
 
Enoch Ambler Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 14, 2013
1. Enoch Ambler Marker
Inscription.
Home of Enoch Ambler
Inventor of First
Mowing Machine
Patent Signed by Pres.
Andrew Jackson in 1834
Heritage & Genealogical Soc. of Montg. Co

 
Erected 2011 by Montgomery County Heritage and Genealogical Society.
 
Location. 42° 51.441′ N, 74° 27.948′ W. Marker is in Root, New York, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Darrow Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is a on Darrow Road a short distance off Route 162 in the hamlet of Currytown. Marker is at or near this postal address: 115 Darrow Road, Sprakers NY 12166, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Currytown Reformed Church (approx. ľ mile away); This Is Mohawk Country (approx. 3.2 miles away); Then and Now (approx. 4.2 miles away); Transportation is King / Modernization (approx. 4.2 miles away); Dam. That's Not a Bridge? (approx. 4.2 miles away); Christian Church (approx. 4.9 miles away); Margaret Houck (approx. 4.9 miles away); Baptist Church (approx. 6.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Root.
 
Regarding Enoch Ambler.
Enoch Ambler, Inventor of
Enoch Ambler Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 14, 2013
2. Enoch Ambler Marker
the Mowing Machine.

Enoch Ambler, formerly a resident of the town of Root, has in his possession letters patent granted December 23, 1834, and executed by Andrew Jackson, President of the United States, securing to him the sole right to a machine of his invention for "cutting hay and grain. " His discovery embraced nearly all the most important principles embodied in the machines now sold. The driving-wheel, crank-movement and guards protecting the knife were as now produced, but the knife itself was a straight edged blade, instead of the more efficient saw-toothed scythe of the modern machines. Mr. Ambler unfortunately had less success in introducing his machine than in constructing it, and, himself hardly aware of its immense value, allowed his patent to expire without availing himself of it. The invention was revived, and the great fortune and grater fame which the inventor deserved went to another than Mr. Ambler, who is now a humble resident of Fulton county. - History of Montgomery and Fulton Counties, New York, F.W. Beers Co., 1878

Reportedly Amblerís original mowing machine was put on trial at a farm near his home in the hamlet of Currytown by a noted and prominent farmer, William P. Dievendorf, “He (Dievendorf) mowed something over an acre of grass, but the scythe being straight and smooth and no guards being used, the work was but imperfectly
Enoch Ambler Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 14, 2013
3. Enoch Ambler Marker
done. The machine was condemned as useless.” In an area newspaper, the Gloversville Intelligencer, dated March 18, 1873, it's reported that “Ambler sold out all his right and title (to his invention) to Mr. (Cyrus) McCormick, the “original” mowing machine man for $250.”

Ambler later moved from the town of Root to Bleecker, which is north of Gloversville, becoming a shingle maker there. According to Root Historian Bill Maring, Amber died of an accidental gunshot wound after a friend's new gun went off while the friend was showing it to Ambler. Ambler, being a man of little means, was buried in the Bleecker Cemetery at the town's expense.

On July 22nd, 2011 the Enoch Ambler marker was dedicated in the presence of Root Town Historian Bill Maring, as well as members of the Root Historical Society and members of the Montgomery County Heritage and Genealogical Society. Special guests also in attendance where Enoch Amblerís great-granddaughter Jane Ambler, of Schenectady, and his great-great-granddaughter Nancy Ambler Weinberg, of Washington, D.C.

There is an example of Ambler's 1836 Patent Mowing Machine on display at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan.
 
Also see . . .  1836 Ambler Patent Mowing Machine. (Submitted on September 15, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Additional keywords.
Enoch Ambler Marker Unveiling image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 14, 2013
4. Enoch Ambler Marker Unveiling
On July 22nd, 2011 the Enoch Ambler marker was unveiled. Present for the ceremony and pictured here are, left to right, Enoch Amblerís great-great- granddaughter Nancy Ambler Weinberg, of Washington, D.C. his great-granddaughter Jane Ambler, of Schenectady, and Root Town Historian, Bill Maring. This photo is on display at the Root Historical Society, which is located in the hamlet of Flat Creek, Montgomery County.
Currytown Silas McCormick
 
Categories. AgricultureMan-Made Features
 
"4 Horse Neck Yoke" image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 14, 2013
5. "4 Horse Neck Yoke"
From the Estate of Paul Dievendorf; According to Mr. Dievendorf this yoke was used by the team of horses that pulled Enoch Ambler's mowing machine when it was tested on the William Dievendorf farm. These items are on display at the Root Historical Society, which is located in the hamlet of Flat Creek, Montgomery County.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 15, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 500 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 15, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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