Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

H.M.S. Seraph

 
 
Seraph Monument Plaque image. Click for full size.
By R. C.
1. Seraph Monument Plaque
Inscription. The submarine memorialized by this monument, has a uniquely distinguished record, and many of her most fascinating exploits involved Americans. Embodied in this memorial are the Seraph's fore hatch, steering and plane wheels, her ship's bell and badge, and her periscope.

Seraph is well remembered for her role in the secret entry into North Africa of Gen. Mark W. Clark when he headed a spy team which made a clandestine rendezvous with Free French leaders there in the critical days of 1942 immediately prior to allied landings on the North African Coast.

During the same year this submarine successfully accomplished another secret mission that mystified the German Enemy. In this episode she was the vessel that permitted French Gen. Henri H. Giraud to elude the Germans who surrounded him in Southern France and escape to aid the Allied Cause. Since Giraud was at odds with the British, he insisted that he would make his escape only on an American submarine. No such vessel was then in the Mediterranean, so an American Naval Officer was placed in technical command of the Seraph. For a time she had two captains and operated under two flags, The American and Royal Navy Ensigns which fly above this monument to commemorate this unusual co-operation between two nations.

Among the Seraph's many other historic missions was
Detail of the Saraph's Ship's Badge image. Click for full size.
By R. C., March 19, 2007
2. Detail of the Saraph's Ship's Badge
a gigantic ruse which saved thousands of allied soldiers' lives in World War II. A book entitled "The Man Who Never Was" describes this adventure, and a moving picture was based on the book. Another book, "The Ship That Had Two Captains," deals primarily with the Giraud adventure.
 
Location. 32° 47.933′ N, 79° 57.583′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Mary Murray Drive. Touch for map. The marker is located at the northeast corner of the main drill field at The Citadel Military College of South Carolina. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29409, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Anchor of the U.S.S. Coral Sea (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Citadel Flag (about 400 feet away); “Thunderbolt” (about 400 feet away); McDonnell F-4C Phantom II (about 500 feet away); The Citadel Bulldog (about 700 feet away); Star of the West (approx. 0.2 miles away); AH – 1 “Cobra” (approx. 0.2 miles away); Genevieve Kanapaux McMahon (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Damn Interesting Article about "The Man Who Never Was.". (Submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.)
Seraph's fore hatch, steering and plane wheels, her ship's bell and badge, and her periscope. image. Click for full size.
By R. C., March 19, 2007
3. Seraph's fore hatch, steering and plane wheels, her ship's bell and badge, and her periscope.

2. Operation Mincemeat - The Man Who Never Was, BBC entry. (Submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.)
3. Submariners Association article on H.M.S. Seraph. (Submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.)
4. Obituary of Seraph's Captain Bill Jewel. Mentioned as part of the Captain's obituary, the Seraph Monument is the only place in the United States permitted to fly the White Ensign of the Royal Navy. (Submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, World IIWaterways & Vessels
 
The American Flag and Royal Navy Ensign image. Click for full size.
By R. C., March 19, 2007
4. The American Flag and Royal Navy Ensign
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,232 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement