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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Union in Union County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Caldwell’s Home

 
 
Caldwell's Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 5, 2008
1. Caldwell's Home Marker
Inscription.
Site of Parsonage used by
James Caldwell family.
Burned by British in 1780.
Mrs. Caldwell was killed
by a British soldier.

(Lower Marker: )
Reverend James Caldwell
and his wife Hannah
moved to this site
after his church in
Elizabethtown was burned
by the British army on
Jan. 25, 1780. Caldwell was
Chaplain of the New Jersey Brigade.

 
Erected 1964 by State of New Jersey.
 
Location. 40° 41.698′ N, 74° 16.736′ W. Marker is in Union, New Jersey, in Union County. Marker is on Caldwell Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 909 Caldwell Avenue, Union NJ 07083, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Caldwell Parsonage (here, next to this marker); American Troops Withdraw (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mass Grave of British and Hessian Troops (approx. 0.3 miles away); Pearl Harbor Square (approx. 0.3 miles away); Revolutionary Soldiers (approx. 0.3 miles away); Washington’s Headquarters
Markers with Caldwell's Parsonage in background image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 5, 2008
2. Markers with Caldwell's Parsonage in background
The Caldwell Parsonage is on the National Register of Historic Places.
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Connecticut Farms (approx. 0.4 miles away); Battle of Connecticut Farms (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Union.
 
Also see . . .  The Battles of Connecticut Farms and Springfield. (Submitted on April 6, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Notable BuildingsWar, US Revolutionary
 
Second Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 18, 2014
3. Second Marker
This museum has been preserved
by the
Union Township
Historical Society
for the
people of Union

Dedicated June 7, 1960
Caldwell's Parsonage image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 5, 2008
4. Caldwell's Parsonage
Rev. Caldwell fled here after the British burned the Presbyterian Church in Elizabethtown, feeling that his family would be safer here, only to have his wife killed by a British soldier in the Parsonage.
1782 Red Brick Wall image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 18, 2014
5. 1782 Red Brick Wall
The original one story house was destroyed by the British and Hessian army on June 7, 1780, during the Battle of Connecticut Farms. While caring for her baby in the first floor bedroom, Hannah Caldwell, the wife of Reverend James Caldwell, was shot and killed by musket fire that is believed to have come from a British or Hessian soldier. The house was then ransacked and burned, as was most of Connecticut Farms on that fateful day. The house was rebuilt with three stories on the original foundation in 1782 by members of the Connecticut Farms community.

A section of the brick wall can be seen inside the Caldwell House.
First Presbyterian Church in Elizabethtown image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 5, 2008
6. First Presbyterian Church in Elizabethtown
Rev. Caldwell was pastor of this church in Elizabethtown from 1761-76. He moved to the parsonage in Connecticut Farmes after the church was burned by the British.
Caldwell Grave image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 5, 2008
7. Caldwell Grave
Rev. Caldwell and his wife Hannah are buried in the churchyard of the First Presbyterian Church in Elizabethtown.
Closeup of Hannah Caldwell's Grave Stone image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 5, 2008
8. Closeup of Hannah Caldwell's Grave Stone
Hannah Caldwell was killed by the British during the Battle of Connecticut Farms.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 6, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,117 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 6, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on May 18, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on April 6, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5. submitted on May 18, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6, 7, 8. submitted on April 6, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Christopher Busta-Peck was the editor who published this page.
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