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Kinston in Lenoir County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Caring for the Wounded

Harriet's Chapel Battlefield Park

 

—Battle of Kinston Military Park —

 
Caring for the Wounded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 26, 2013
1. Caring for the Wounded Marker
Inscription. As the fighting surged past the church and the battle moves into Kinston, surgeons of both armies began the task of caring for the wounded. Harriet’s Chapel became a refuge and men from both sides found care at the church.

The fighting around Harriet’s Chapel was some of the fiercest of the battle. The building served as a defensive position while the battle raged. When Union forces arrived at the church, “Dead bodies lay scattered about the floor and our surgeons immediately appropriated it for a hospital.” Soldiers brought the wounded to the church for treatment. Surgeons using bone saws went about the gruesome task of amputation. Others did their best to treat and comfort the men who lay on the floor or on the pews.

The Union troops carried most of their wounded back to New Bern but the wounded Confederates remained in Kinston. The land around Harriet’s Chapel became a burial ground for both the Union and Confederate dead. The Federal government removed the Union remains to New Bern National Cemetery in the 1860s. The Confederate dead remained here until 1881, when they were reinterred in Maplewood Cemetery.

(captions)
(lower left) The grounds around Harriet’s Chapel must have looked like this after the battle. This hand-tinted photograph was taken at Savage Station, Virginia,
Caring for the Wounded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 26, 2013
2. Caring for the Wounded Marker
in 1862.

(upper right) Union doctors care for Confederate wounded.

(lower right) The Confederate Monument in Maplewood Cemetery marks the resting place of forty-four Confederate soldiers.
 
Erected by Battle of Kinston Military Park.
 
Location. 35° 14.508′ N, 77° 35.28′ W. Marker is in Kinston, North Carolina, in Lenoir County. Marker is on Richlands Road (U.S. 258) near Measley Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. The marker is located on the grounds of the Kinston Battlefield Park. Marker is in this post office area: Kinston NC 28504, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Site of Harriet's Chapel (here, next to this marker); The Confederate Defenses of Kinston (a few steps from this marker); The Night of December 13, 1862 (a few steps from this marker); Fighting at Harriet's Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); Kinston Battlefield Park (within shouting distance of this marker); First Battle of Kinston (within shouting distance of this marker); Wessells' Advance—December 14, 1862 (within shouting distance of this marker); The Center of the Confederate Line (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kinston.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Caring for the Wounded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 26, 2013
3. Caring for the Wounded Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 26, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 359 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 26, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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