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Petersburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

U.S. Colored Troops

 
 
U.S. Colored Troops Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
1. U.S. Colored Troops Monument
Inscription. In memory of the valorous service of Regiments and Companies of the U.S. Colored Troops Army of the James and Army of the Potomac Siege of Petersburg 1864 – 65
 
Location. 37° 13.945′ N, 77° 21.27′ W. Marker is in Petersburg, Virginia. Marker is on Siege Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in Petersburg National Battlefield. It is located at Tour Stop 3. Marker is in this post office area: Petersburg VA 23803, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Monotonous Toil ( a few steps from this marker); Prince George Court House Road ( within shouting distance of this marker); Infantry Earthworks ( within shouting distance of this marker); “A Splendid Charge” ( within shouting distance of this marker); Battery 8 of the Dimmock Line ( approx. 0.3 miles away); Dividing Point ( approx. half a mile away); Confederate Battery 6 ( approx. ĺ mile away); Jordon Family Cemetery ( approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Petersburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Petersburg National Battlefield. National Park Service. (Submitted on April 13, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Siege of Petersburg
U.S. Colored Troops Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
2. U.S. Colored Troops Monument
The monument is at the beginning of the Meade Station Trail.
. (Submitted on April 13, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
3. ...The United States Colored Troops: Infantry Organizations, 36th Through 40th. The US National Archives and Record Administrations compilation of USCT records, with introduction: ...Approximately 179,000 African Americans served in the ranks of the USCT, under nearly 6,000 white officers and 87 black officers. The USCT fought in 39 major engage- ments and over 400 lesser ones. Sixteen African American soldiers received the Medal of Honor as a result of their service during the Civil War. As in other units, the death toll from disease was very high in the USCT. Deaths from disease and battle totaled approximately 37,000. The last regiments of the USCT mustered out of Federal service in December 1867. (Submitted on October 12, 2015.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
<i>Field and staff of 39th U.S. Colored Infantry In front of Petersburg, Va. September 1864.</i> image. Click for full size.
1864
3. Field and staff of 39th U.S. Colored Infantry In front of Petersburg, Va. September 1864.
The 39th United States Colored Infantry was organized at Baltimore, MD, from March 22 to 31, 1864. The regiment was assigned to the 9th Corp of the Army of Potomac and stationed at Manassas Junction, VA, in April 1864. The 39th USCI supported the Army of the Potomacís overland campaign in Virginia from May to June by guarding the armyís wagon trains. The 39th USCI was transferred to the siege of Petersburg in July 1864, and was heavily engaged at the Battle of the Mine on July 30, 1864. The regiment participated in combat at Weldon Railroad (August 18–21), Poplar Grove Church (September 29–30), and Hatcherís Run (October 27–28). The 39th USCI participated in the capture of Fort Fisher on January 15, 1865, and the occupation of Wilmington, NC, on February 22. In April 1865, the regiment participated in the capture of Raleigh and was present at the surrender of Joseph Johnstonís army. The 39th USCI remained on duty throughout North Carolina until it mustered out of service on December 4, 1865.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 13, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 961 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 13, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on October 12, 2015. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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