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Derry-Londonderry in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom
 

Grand Parade

 
 
Grand Parade Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 18, 2012
1. Grand Parade Marker
Inscription.

Fourteen sycamores
There are 14 sycamore trees on the Grand Parade, one for each of the 13 Apprentice Boys and one for James Morrison, their look-out on Ferryquay Gate. The fruit of the sycamore are like bunches of keys. They represent the keys of the city with which the Apprentice Boys locked the gates.

Parading and promenading
In the 18th century the city garrison used this part of the walls for exercises and parades. It later became fashionable to promenade along the Grand Parade which was laid out as a garden. Strollers averted their eyes from the smoke and grime of the houses of Nailor's Row that clung to the steep slope between the Royal and Double Bastions.

Fortress on the hill
In 1600 Sir Henry Docwra chose this hill as the site for his main fort. It gave him an excellent vantage point from which to watch the surrounding country. He circled the fort and his own house with earthen walls. Outside them he built a hospital and a gallows. A smaller fort defended access from the river. After his troops became ill from drinking the water, he also built a brewery by the river.

A holy place since 546 AD
People may have worshipped here for over 1400 years. According to tradition St. Colm Cille built a monastery on the top of the hill, replaced in the late
Grand Parade Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 18, 2012
2. Grand Parade Marker
Apprentice Boys Memorial Hall in background
13th century by an Augustinian abbey. Though largely in ruins, the abbey served as the first church for the Plantation settlers until St. Columb's Cathedral was completed in 1633. Thereafter St. Augustine's became known as 'the little chapel'. The present building dates from 1872.
 
Location. 54° 59.724′ N, 7° 19.469′ W. Marker is in Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland, in County Londonderry. Touch for map. Marker is on the city wall walking path along Upper Magazine Street, about 30 meters west of the Apprentice Boys Memorial Hall. Marker is at or near this postal address: 13 Society Street, Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland BT48 6PJ, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Royal Bastion (within shouting distance of this marker); Walker Memorial Pillar (within shouting distance of this marker); The Platform (within shouting distance of this marker); St Columba (within shouting distance of this marker); SeŠn Keenan / ” CianŠin (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Butcher Gate (about 120 meters away); a different marker also named Butcher Gate (about 120 meters away); Bloody Sunday (about 150 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Derry-Londonderry.
 
Also see . . .
1. Apprentice Boys of Derry. (Submitted on December 30, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. History of Derry, Ireland. (Submitted on December 30, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. St Columb's Cathedral, Derry. (Submitted on December 30, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. Early History of St. Augustine's Church, Derry. (Submitted on December 30, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Forts, CastlesMan-Made FeaturesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 30, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 257 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 30, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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