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Oakland in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Jack London

1876-1916

 
 
Jack London Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 9, 2014
1. Jack London Marker
Inscription.
In 1886, ten year old Jack London traveled to Oakland with his family and led the rough and ready life of countless other working class lads of that era. Though he labored at menial jobs, the world of books captured his imagination at an early age and his mind remained open to new ideas and learning. Jack Londonís life and career were influenced by the colorful yarns from hard-drinking sailors and risk-taking oyster pirates that he heard in Heinoldís Saloon. A year in the frozen Yukon provided additional inspiration for his writing. During his brief, brilliant career, London produced over fifty volumes of novels, essays, short stories and newspaper reports. In 1916, at the age of forty, he died as he lived.

“I would rather be ashes than dust! I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by dry rot.”

Donated in memory of

Jules and Silvia Rodesta
 
Erected by Port of Oakland.
 
Location. 37° 47.667′ N, 122° 16.651′ W. Marker is in Oakland, California, in Alameda County. Marker can be reached from Broadway near Water Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2 Broadway, Oakland CA 94607, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Jack London Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 9, 2014
2. Jack London Marker
Statue of Jack London in the background.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Oakland's First Wharf (here, next to this marker); Pony Express Ferry "Oakland" (a few steps from this marker); Origins of Oakland (within shouting distance of this marker); Live Oak Lodge U.D (within shouting distance of this marker); Oakland Railroad History (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Jack London Square Development (about 600 feet away); USS Potomac (about 700 feet away); Evolution of a Marine Terminal (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oakland.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located in Jack London Square. Jack London Square is closed to vehicular traffic
 
Also see . . .  Jack London - Biography.com. Jack London was born John Griffith Chaney on January 12, 1876, in San Francisco, California. After working in the Klondike, London returned home and began publishing stories. His novels, including The Call of the Wild, White Fang and Martin Eden, placed London among the most popular American authors of his time. London, who was also a journalist and an outspoken socialist, died in 1916. (Submitted on January 12, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, Music
 
Statue of Jack London image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 9, 2014
3. Statue of Jack London
The plaque below reads:

“I would rather be ashes than dust!
I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze
than it should be stifled by dry rot.
I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me
in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.
The proper function of man is trying to prolong them.
I shall use my time.”
- Jack London –

Jack London
1876-1916

Monument Sponsors
The Port of Oakland
Buzz and Joan Gibb and the Waterfront Plaza Hotel
Barnes and Noble Bookstore
The Mario J. Lucchi Family
AMPCO Systems Parking/A.B.M. Engineering Services
ACSS Security Services/ and A.B.M. Maintenance Company

Artist: Cedric Wentworth
Jack London image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, circa n/a
4. Jack London
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 12, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 500 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 12, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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