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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Montgomery in Montgomery County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Forest Avenue's Medical Facilities / Oak Park Montgomery's First Public Park

 
 
Forest Avenue's Medical Facilities Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 12, 2014
1. Forest Avenue's Medical Facilities Marker
Inscription.
Side A
Forest Avenue's Medical Facilities

With the growth of the Highland Park suburb in the 1890s, a medical community developed along Forest Avenue. In 1895, Dr. Isaac Watkins opened Highland Park Sanatorium in three frame houses in the 500 block. In early 1920s, Watkins sold to Dr. T. Brannon Hubbard who practiced in one and conducted a nursing school in another. Later, he built Hubbard Hospital adjacent to them. Dr. Hubbard closed his hospital in 1956, but continued to practice until 1968. In the 1930s, a Children's Hospital provided services by pediatrician Dr. C. Hilton Rice. Following World War II, in 1946, Dr. Frank Jackson and twelve other doctors founded Jackson Hospital that expanded into one of the largest in the area. In addition to the hospitals, hundreds of individual doctors have devoted themselves to the community, carrying out the medical traditions established here in the late 19th century.


Side B
Oak Park
Montgomery's First Public Park


Streetcar and land developers opened Highland Park in 1886 at same time adjacent suburb with that name was developing. In mid-1890s, City purchased park and renamed it. Oak Park became popular with zoo, pools, pavilion and picnic areas. A segregated facility, the City closed it in 1957, but re-opened
Oak Park Montgomery's First Public Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 12, 2014
2. Oak Park Montgomery's First Public Park Marker
it in 1965 as integrated park and gardens. In 1968-69, City built W.A. Gayle Planetarium, operated by Troy University. For years, the well-loved Myers Pop Corn served thousands of happy customers who proved his slogan "By My Corn I Shall Be Known." Marcus B. Myers's stand was just outside the Oak Park gates on Forest Avenue; he was known throughout the neighborhood for his generosity and kindness to the children who were patients in nearby hospitals.
 
Erected 2007 by the Alabama Historical Association.
 
Location. 32° 22.126′ N, 86° 17.193′ W. Marker is in Montgomery, Alabama, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of Forest Avenue and Park Place, on the right when traveling south on Forest Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Forest Avenue, Montgomery AL 36106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Johnnie R. and Arlam Carr, Sr. Home (approx. 0.3 miles away); Alabama State University / Tatum Street (approx. 0.3 miles away); Home of Ralph David Abernathy (approx. 0.3 miles away); Birthplace of Nat "King" Cole (approx. 0.4 miles away); Aurelia Eliscera Shines Browder
Jackson Hospital image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 12, 2014
3. Jackson Hospital
(approx. half a mile away); Alabama State University / Tullibody (approx. 0.6 miles away); Marshall J. Moore House (approx. 0.6 miles away); Rosa Louise Parks (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montgomery.
 
Also see . . .
1. History of Jackson Hospital. (Submitted on January 13, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. A Walk through Oak Park. (Submitted on January 13, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Science & Medicine
 
Oak Park image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 12, 2014
4. Oak Park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 30, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 13, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 499 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 13, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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