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Chatham in Chatham-Kent County, Ontario — Central Canada
 

British Encampment: Forks of the Thames

Sunday, October 3, 1813

 

—Tecumseh Parkway —

 
British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2013
1. British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker
Inscription. While British Army was encamped at Dolsen's, Procter travelled to Fairfield to investigate the site as a defensive position. At Tecumseh's urging, and learning that the Americans were closing rapidly, Colonel Warburton, Procter's second-in-command, ordered the army to break camp and move up-river. The British departure from Dolsen's caused a rift among the warriors because many of them wanted to engage the Americans at Dolsen's despite Tecumseh's desire to fight at the Forks. By militia officer William Caldwell's account, 600 warriors deserted with their families once the British began moving to the Forks, believing that they could no longer outpace the American advance.

On the evening of October 3, the British Army encamped at the Forks on the north side of the Thames River across from this site. On the morning of October 4, while Tecumseh was preparing to confront Harrison's army, the British continued their withdrawal towards Fairfield.

Campement Britanique: Les Fourches De La Rivière Thames
Le Dimanche 3 Octobre 1813

Tandis que l'armée britannique était campée à Dolsen's Landing, Procter se rendit à Fairfield pour évaluer ce site comme position de défense. Sur l'insistance de Tecumseh, ét apprenant que les Américains approchaient rapidement, le Colonel Warburton, commandant adjoint
British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2013
2. British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker
Close-up view, looking west, of the English text side of the historical marker.
de Procter, donna l'ordre à l'armée de lever le camp et de remonter la rivière. Le départ des Britanniques de Dolsen's Landing provoqua une division chez les guerriers, car plusieurs d'entre eux voulaient affronter les Américains à Dolsen's Landing malgré le désir de Tecumseh de combattre à la fourche. Selon le rapport de l'officier de Milice William Caldwell, 600 guerriers, ainsi que leurs familles, désertèrent lorsque les Britanniques commencèrent à avancer vers les Fourches, croyant qu'ils ne pourraient plus distancer l'avance américaine.

Le soir du 3 octobre, l'armée britannique établit son campement à la fourche, sur la rive nord de la rivière Thames, à l'opposé de ce site. Le matin du 4 octobre, alors que Tecumseh se préparait à affronter l'armée d'Harrison, les Britanniques continuèrent leur retrait vers Fairfield.
 
Erected by Tecumseh Parkway.
 
Location. 42° 24.4′ N, 82° 11.066′ W. Marker is in Chatham, Ontario, in Chatham-Kent County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of William Street North and Murray Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. The historical marker is located in Chatham, at the point of "The Forks" of the Thames River, in Tecumseh Park, situated along a park walkway. Marker
British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2013
3. British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker
Close-up view, looking east, of the French text side of the historical marker.
is at or near this postal address: 89 William Street North, Chatham, Ontario N7M 4L5, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Skirmish at the Forks (here, next to this marker); The Forks (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Skirmish at the Forks (here, next to this marker); Casualties of the Skirmish (here, next to this marker); Tecumseh (within shouting distance of this marker); Chatham Blockhouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Chatham Armoury (about 150 meters away, measured in a direct line); John Brown's Convention 1858 (approx. 0.7 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chatham.
 
Categories. Native AmericansWar of 1812
 
British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2013
4. British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker
View of the historical marker in the foreground, with a view of the "The Forks" of the Thames River in the background.
British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2013
5. British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker
View of the park walkway that leads to "The Forks" of the Thames River, where several Tecumseh Parkway historical markers are located.
British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2013
6. British Encampment: Forks of the Thames Marker
View of the "The Forks" of the Thames River, where several Tecumseh Parkway historical markers are located.
View of The Forks image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2013
7. View of The Forks
View of the cannon situated at "The Forks" of the Thames River.
Tecumseh Park Sign image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2013
8. Tecumseh Park Sign
View, looking north on William Street North, of the sign for Tecumseh Park, where the historical marker is located, and a distant view of the Tecumseh Parkway sign used to alert motorists of the presence of these historical markers.
The Forks of the Thames Sign image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2013
9. The Forks of the Thames Sign
View, looking north on William Street North, of the Tecumseh Parkway sign used to alert motorists of the presence of these historical markers in Tecumseh Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 22, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 19, 2014, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 411 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on January 19, 2014, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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