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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Packwood in Lewis County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Traveling Over the Cascades: Past and Present

 
 
Traveling Over the Cascades: Past and Present Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 31, 2010
1. Traveling Over the Cascades: Past and Present Marker
Inscription. Before Euro-Americans arrived, Native people crossed the mountains on rugged trails to visit relatives, trade with other tribes, and gather food for winter. Later, prospectors, sheepherders, settlers and early Forest Service rangers used the same trails on foot or horseback. In the late 1800's, engineers explored this area to find a route for the Northern Pacific Railroad. The mountains were too steep. Not until 1951 was Highway 12 completed across the mountains.

Present: Travel through a geologic wonderland
Today, highways provide easy access to many fascinating sites to see and things to do. Highway 12 passes through one of the most interesting geologic landscapes in Washington. Here, travelers can see volcanoes of many kinds, shapes, and sizes.

A   Cinder cones are smaller with steep sides, usually basalt from a single eruption.
Spiral Butte is an example of a cinder cone.

B   Large strato-volcanoes, layered cones of lava, ash and rock tower above surrounding peaks.
Strato-volcanoes include Mt. Ranier, Mount St. Helens and Mt. Adams.

C   Shield volcanoes, named for their low, flattened shape, form from thin basalt lava flows.
Shield volcanoes are difficult to see because of their low profile.

D   Intrusions were formed when
The Palisades near the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 31, 2010
2. The Palisades near the Marker
The Palisades are dacite columns formed between 110,000 and 20,000 years ago
lava solidified underground and surrounding material eroded away.
Goose Egg Mountain was formed from an intrusion.

(Top Center Drawing Caption)
Beautiful coiled baskets made from cedar roots and dyed ryegrass were used to carry roots, berries and as trade items.

(Top Right Drawing Caption)
White Pass was named for Charles A. White, one of the engineers who explored the area in 1877 to find a railroad route. The drawing above illustrates the difficult conditions an early survey crew may have faced.
 
Location. 46° 41.044′ N, 121° 32.965′ W. Marker is near Packwood, Washington, in Lewis County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 12 0.1 miles east of Forest Service Road 1276, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located at the Palisades Viewpoint scenic pullout. Marker is in this post office area: Packwood WA 98361, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Palisades are Clues to the Past (within shouting distance of this marker); Packwood (approx. 7.9 miles away); The Story of Kloochman Rock (approx. 9.6 miles away); Inspired to Preserve (approx. 11.1 miles away); An Ancient Community (approx. 11.3 miles away).
 
Categories. EnvironmentNative AmericansRailroads & StreetcarsRoads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 10, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 278 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 10, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo of wide-view of marker and surroundings. • Can you help?
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